Tag Archives: workplace harassment

New Jersey Law Aims to Reduce Sexual Assault and Harassment of Hotel Workers

In an attempt to protect hotel employees such as housekeepers and room service attendants from violent acts by hotel guests, including sexual assault and harassment, New Jersey recently passed a novel law requiring New Jersey hotels with more than 100 guest rooms to arm hotel employees assigned to work in a guest room alone with a free panic button device. Under the law, hotel employees who activate the button on the reasonable belief there is an ongoing crime, immediate threat of assault or harassment, or other emergency, can immediately leave the guest’s room and await assistance without facing an adverse employment action.

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New California Law Aims To Protect Employers and Harassment Victims from Defamation Lawsuits

On July 9, 2018, Governor Edmund Brown, Jr. signed into law Assembly Bill 2770 (“AB 2770”) to protect victims of sexual harassment and employers from defamation claims brought by alleged harassers. AB 2770 was sponsored by the California Chamber of Commerce and passed by the California Legislature to address the chilling effect that the threat of defamation suits can have on harassment victims and employers: deterring victims and witnesses from coming forward; deterring employers from telling prospective employers about a genuine harasser; and allowing repeat sexual harassers to harass future victims at their new place of employment.

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New EEOC Commentary on Workplace Harassment

Last week, the EEOC released its latest edition of its federal sector Digest of Equal Opportunity Law, a quarterly publication featuring recent Commission decisions and federal court cases selected by EEOC’s Office of Federal Operations. This edition features an article titled, “Promising Practices for Preventing Harassment,” which is the fruition of an EEOC task force on workplace harassment. The article, which is particularly timely given the #MeToo movement, advances five core principles to deter and remedy harassment: (1) committed and engaged leadership; (2) consistent and demonstrated accountability; (3) strong and comprehensive harassment policies; (4) trusted and accessible complaint procedures; and (5) regular, interactive training tailored to the audience and the organization.

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Washington Prohibits Nondisclosure Agreements Related to Sexual Harassment or Assault

On March 21, 2018, Washington Governor Jay Inslee signed bill SB 5996 (the “Law”), which prohibits employers from requiring as a condition of employment that employees sign a nondisclosure agreement preventing them from discussing workplace sexual harassment or sexual assault. The Law goes into effect on June 7, 2018.

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ILN Today Post

You and your Rights – Sexual Harassment in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas

We have seen a great debate unfold in the United States over the last few months as to the rights of working women on the job. The movement is not gender specific nor is it limited to the dominant campaign which has been led by American women. The movement was started by Alyssa Milano, the “Charmed “actress. She fashioned the hash tag metoo and since, it has become a social media sensation. The purpose of the hash tag was to inform the public how pervasive the problem  of sexual harassment is .Today it is a platform for working men and women  to tell their stories of sexual violation and harassment in the workplace. Started by an actress, the # Metoo movement raises very important issues as to workplace safety and the rights of working women and men to work in a “sexual harassment free “environment. It has been characterized as a campaign which was started to expose the alleged sexual abuses of Hollywood powerful media mogul Harvey Weinstein. It has now morphed into a “heat seeking missile” exposing serial sexual abuse in the workplace. Since the Weinstein story broke the United States has witnessed an explosion of similar complaints across America. What about the Bahamas..?

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“Smile . . . You’re on Your Employee’s (Not So) Candid Camera!”

Imagine that an employee asks to come to your office to address concerns about workplace harassment. Pursuant to the company’s open door and non-harassment policies, you promptly schedule a meeting. When the employee arrives, she sits down, sets her smartphone on the desk facing you, and turns on the video camera before beginning to speak. Can you instruct her to turn off the recording device? Can you stop the meeting if she refuses? Would the answer change if the recording was surreptitious?

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