Tag Archives: Toronto

ILN Today Post

HAS YOUR BUSINESS IMPLEMENTED ONTARIO’S NEW COVID-19 SCREENING MEASURES?

In response to the recent surge of COVID-19 cases, the Ontario government has decided to implement an additional public health measure to help the fight against COVID-19. As of September 26, 2020, all employers, regardless of the sector they belong to, are now required to pre-screen their workers and any essentials visitors prior to their entry into the workplace. “Workers” include students, contractors or volunteers that conduct business or related activities where applicable and appropriate. “Essential visitors” include individuals providing a service in the establishment who are not employees or patrons o f the establishment (e.g., delivery, maintenance, contract workers).

Read full article
ILN Today Post

IS YOUR BUSINESS ESSENTIAL?

On March 23, 2020, Ontario Premier Doug Ford ordered that that all non-essential
stores and services be closed by Tuesday, March 24, 2020 at 11:59 p.m. (the “Order”). This Order follows a series of orders made by the provincial government, pursuant to its powers under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act’, made in an attempt to slow the spread of COVID-19 and protect Ontarians during these unprecedented times. Read more…

Read full article

Ontario Judge Considers Systemic Anti-Black Racism As A Sentencing Principle

Earlier this year, a Toronto jury found Kevin Morris (“Morris”), a 26 year old black man, guilty of several gun-related charges including possession of an unauthorized firearm, possession of a prohibited firearm with ammunition and carrying a concealed weapon.  The jury acquitted Morris of assaulting a police officer with intent to resist arrest. Morris was sentenced to 15 months in jail.  Predictably, there was an outcry in some media and corners of the criminal justice community that the sentence was too lenient and “soft on crime”.  On September 11, 2018, several months after Morris’s conviction, Justice Shaun Nakatsuru, the trial judge, released his written reasons for the sentence, including why he spared Morris from serving time in a federal penitentiary.   The reasons run twenty-one pages in length.  At the end of the reasons, Justice Nakatsuru attached as an appendix a report entitled “Expert Report on Crime, Criminal Justice and the Experience of Black Canadians in Toronto,” written by three social scientists.  The appended report, also runs 21 pages in length, excluding another 10 pages of footnotes.
Read full article
ILN Today Post

Triggers to update your will: family changes

This is Part 2 of a three-part series where Toronto wills and estates lawyer Mary Wahbi talks about the life events that should trigger a review of your will. In this instalment, she explores changes in family life situations that should spur you to update your will.

One of the most important times to update estate planning is when there has been a change in family life or relationships, says Toronto estates lawyer Mary Wahbi.

Read More

Read full article

SCC Provides Guidance On When Costs Should Be Awarded Against Lawyers Personally

In a decision that was unsettling to many lawyers – Quebec (DCPP) v. Jodoin [2017] 1 SCR 478 – the Supreme Court of Canada upheld a lower court’s decision to award costs against a lawyer personally in a criminal proceeding.
 In April 2013, a criminal lawyer Jodoin, was representing ten clients charged with impaired driving, and other charges.  There were twelve cases and they were jointly scheduled for a hearing in the Court of Quebec on a motion for disclosure of evidence.  On the morning of the hearing, Jodoin had the office of the Superior Court stamp a series of motions for writs of prohibition in which he challenged the jurisdiction of the judge who was to preside over the hearing, alleging bias on the judge’s part.  As an experienced criminal lawyer, Jodoin knew that the filing of such motions would result in the immediate postponement of the hearing until the Superior Court had ruled on them.
Read full article

Supreme Court of Canada Extends Human Rights Protection from Employment Discrimination to Co-Workers

In British Columbia Human Rights Tribunal v. Schrenk 2017 SCC62, a majority of the Supreme Court of Canada found that the British Columbia Human Rights Code’s (“Code”) prohibition against discrimination “regarding employment” prohibits discrimination against employees even where the discriminatory conduct was carried out by a co-worker and not the employer.  The court held that the Code applies whenever the discrimination has a “sufficient nexus” with employment.
Read full article