Tag Archives: telemedicine

ILN Today Post

LEGAL AND REGULATORY FRAMEWORK FOR DIGITAL HEALTH – TELEMEDICINE PRACTICE GUIDELINES

In a significant move, the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (“MoHFW”) on March 25, 2020 has issued the Telemedicine Practice Guidelines (“Guidelines”) for enabling Registered Medical Practitioners (“RMPs”) to provide healthcare using telemedicine. As per the Guidelines, ‘telemedicine’ is the delivery of health care services, where distance is a critical factor, by all the healthcare professionals using information and communication technologies for the exchange of valid information for diagnosis, treatment and prevention of disease and injuries, research and evaluation, all in the interests of advancing the health of individuals and their communities.

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OIG Approves Per-Click Fee Arrangement for Online Healthcare Directory

On September 10, 2019, the Office of Inspector General of the Department of Health and Human Services (“OIG”) published Advisory Opinion 19-04.  In this favorable opinion, OIG approved a technology company’s proposal to make its online healthcare directory search results visible to federal healthcare beneficiaries in locations where the company charges the healthcare professionals a per-click or per-booking fee to be included in the directory.  It also approved the company’s proposal to make sponsored advertisements that appear on its online healthcare directory and on third-party websites visible to federal healthcare beneficiaries.

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Will Federal Special Registration Exception Preempt More Stringent State Rules on Remote Prescribing of Controlled Substances?

The Ryan Haight Act Online Pharmacy Consumer Protection Act of 2008 (21 U.S.C. § 802(54)) (the “Ryan Haight Act” or “Act”) expanded the federal Controlled Substances Act to define appropriate internet usage in the dispensing and prescribing of schedule drugs, and in doing so effectively banned the issuance of prescriptions via telemedicine services for any controlled substances unless the ordering physician has conducted at least one in-person evaluation of the patient. The Act includes multiple exceptions that permit prescribing of controlled substances without conducting an in-person evaluation, the most relevant to the practice of telemedicine being the mandate that the Drug Enforcement Administration (“DEA”) or other federal agency establish rules for a “Special Registration” to be utilized by health care providers. However, despite the statutory mandate, since the 2008 passing of the Act neither the DEA nor any other federal agency has promulgated any regulation or other guidance regarding the development and implementation of such a Special Registration process.

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OIG Concludes IT Donation to Facilitate Telemedicine Consultations is Low Risk

The Office of Inspector General (“OIG”) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services issued Advisory Opinion No. 18-03 in support of an arrangement where a federally qualified health center look-alike (the “Provider”) would donate free information technology-related equipment and services to a county health clinic (the “County Clinic”) to facilitate telemedicine encounters with the County Clinic’s patients (the “Proposed Arrangement”).  The OIG concluded that although the Proposed Arrangement could potentially generate prohibited remuneration under the federal Anti-Kickback Statute (“AKS”) and Civil Monetary Penalties Law (“CMPL”) with the requisite intent to induce or reward referrals of federal health care programs, the OIG would exercise its discretion and not sanction the Provider or the County Clinic (collectively the “Requestors”).

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Law Urging DEA to Promulgate Rules for “Special Registration” Likely This Summer

At first blush, the passage of House Bill 5483, entitled the “Special Registration for Telemedicine Clarification Act of 2018” (the “Bill”), appears to address the issue concerning the lack of regulatory guidance regarding the “Special Registration” exception to the Ryan Haight Act of 2008; however, a deeper and more careful analysis reveals that the Bill may not be as effective as most health care practitioners may hope. The Bill, sponsored by Rep. Carter (R-Georgia), a pharmacist, Rep. Bustos (D-Illinois), and nine others, cleared the House on June 12, 2018 without objection. The Bill would require the federal Drug Enforcement Agency (“DEA”) to promulgate rules that would allow health care providers to apply for a “Special Registration” that would allow a provider to prescribe controlled substances via telehealth without first conducting an initial in-person examination of the patient. A transcript of the testimony in support of the Bill (“Transcript”) reveals enthusiasm by the sponsors of the Bill, as well as by Representatives Pallone (D-New Jersey) and Walden (R-Oregon), who called the Bill “a commonsense measure that cuts through the red tape to provide more treatment options to underserved communities through the use of telemedicine.” While Section 413 of the current version of S.B. 2680 would only give the DEA six months to promulgate such rules, the two bills are very similar and almost guarantee that a law will be signed in the coming months that will require DEA to promulgate rules that will finally create a Special Registration exception to the Ryan Haight Act. While the prospect of rules implementing the Special Registration may be exciting for many practitioners, it should be noted that the DEA has been obligated to create these regulations, and has ignored this obligation, for a decade.

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OIG Finds CMS Overpayments for Telehealth Services

 

 

 

 

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Inspector General (OIG) recently released a report revealing that during OIG’s 2014 and 2015 audits of telehealth claims, more than half of the professional telehealth claims paid by the Medicare program did not have matching originating-site facility claims.

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Vulnerable Populations and Impact on Telemedicine with FCC’s Removed Regulations

Our colleague Ebunola Aniyikaiye at Epstein Becker Green has a post on the Health Law Advisor blog that will be of interest to our readers: “A Case for an Exception to the FCC Rule: Vulnerable Populations and Telemedicine.”

Following is an excerpt:

On December 14, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted to remove regulations that prohibit providers from blocking websites or charging for high quality service to access specific content. Many worry that allowing telecommunications companies to favor certain businesses will cause problems within the health care industry. Specifically, concerns have risen about the effect of the ruling on the progress of telemedicine and the role it plays in access to care. …

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A Case for an Exception to the FCC Rule: Vulnerable Populations and Telemedicine

On December 14, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted to remove regulations that prohibit providers from blocking websites or charging for high quality service to access specific content. Many worry that allowing telecommunications companies to favor certain businesses will cause problems within the health care industry. Specifically, concerns have risen about the effect of the ruling on the progress of telemedicine and the role it plays in access to care. Experts worry that a tiered system in which service providers can charge more for speed connectivity can be detrimental to vulnerable populations.  Although the ramifications of the ruling are not entirely known, an exception for health care services would ensure that vulnerable populations can continue to gain access to care.

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Opioid Addiction Treatment Through Telemedicine: How Federal Law Prohibits, but Could Permit, Controlled Substance Prescribing

On October 26, 2017, President Trump directed the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (“Secretary”) to declare a National Public Health Emergency on the opioid epidemic. While the President offered few details regarding how his administration will address the challenge of treating patients struggling with opioid addiction, a previous statement from the White House indicated that the Administration plans to expand access to treatment via telemedicine and more specifically, remote prescribing of the necessary controlled substances used to treat these patients. While this is a logical step, and one that has been advocated at length by states and health care experts, alike, expanding health care providers’ capabilities to utilize remote prescribing to treat opioid addiction will likely run afoul of existing federal law.

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OIG Updates FY 2017 Work Plan to Include Review of Medicare Claims for Telehealth Services Provided to Rural Beneficiaries: Will Substantive Change to Medicare Reimbursement for Telehealth Follow?

Updates to OIG FY 2017 Work Plan

The United States Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) Office of the Inspector General (“OIG”) recently updated its FY 2017 Work Plan. Traditionally, OIG’s annual Work Plan has given health care providers a preview of OIG’s enforcement priorities. With the OIG now making updates to its Work Plan on a monthly basis, providers stand to gain even more insight into how the focus of OIG is constantly shifting in order to assist in the identification of significant compliance risk areas.

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