Tag Archives: telehealth

Top Five Takeaways from MedPAC’s Meeting on Medicare Issues and Policy Developments – October 2017

The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (“MedPAC”) met in Washington, DC, on October 5-6, 2017. The purpose of this and other public meetings of MedPAC is for the commissioners to review the issues and challenges facing the Medicare program and then make policy recommendations to Congress. MedPAC issues these recommendations in two annual reports, one in March and another in June. MedPAC’s meetings can provide valuable insight into the state of Medicare, the direction of the program moving forward, and the content of MedPAC’s next report to Congress.

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Considerations When Treating Natural Disaster Victims Through Telemental / Telebehavioral Health Programs

You need not spend much time reading the news to know that recent Hurricanes Harvey and Irma have disrupted the lives of tens of thousands of individuals, many of whom may already have behavioral health needs; however, the trauma caused by these recent natural disasters, and others, has created an immense need for additional behavioral and mental health services. For example, a 2012 study entitled “The Impact of Hurricane Katrina on the Mental and Physical Health of Low-Income Parents in New Orleans” reported elevated rates of incidence of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (“PTSD”), depression, and a need for mental health services for as much as 50 percent of the low-income population affected by Hurricane Katrina, which hit in August 2005. A Fortune Magazine article reported elevated incidences of PTSD, depression, and anxiety experienced by victims of Hurricane Sandy, which hit in October 2012. In the wake of Hurricane Harvey, some telehealth providers have offered free telehealth services to hurricane victims and a few behavioral health providers have established specific programs focused on providing access to behavioral health services. However, additional services are still needed to treat the long-term mental health needs of these victims.

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MedPAC Discusses Medicare Payments for Telehealth Services and Utilization Trends

Pursuant to the 21st Century Cures Act of 2016, Congress mandated the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (“MedPAC”) to provide a report to Congress by March 15, 2018, in which MedPAC has been asked to answer the following questions:

  1. Under the Medicare Fee-for-Service program (Parts A and B), what is the current coverage of telehealth services?
  2. Currently, what coverage do commercial health plans offer for telehealth services?
  3. In what ways can the Medicare Fee-for-Service program adopt some or all the telehealth service coverage presently found in commercial health plans?
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Top Five Takeaways from MedPAC’s Meeting on Medicare Issues and Policy Developments – September 2017

The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (“MedPAC”) met in Washington, DC, on September 7-8, 2017. The purpose of this and other public meetings of MedPAC is for the commissioners to review the issues and challenges facing the Medicare program and then make policy recommendations to Congress. MedPAC issues these recommendations in two annual reports, one in March and another in June. MedPAC’s meetings can provide valuable insight into the state of Medicare, the direction of the program moving forward, and the content of MedPAC’s next report to Congress.

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OIG Updates FY 2017 Work Plan to Include Review of Medicare Claims for Telehealth Services Provided to Rural Beneficiaries: Will Substantive Change to Medicare Reimbursement for Telehealth Follow?

Updates to OIG FY 2017 Work Plan

The United States Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) Office of the Inspector General (“OIG”) recently updated its FY 2017 Work Plan. Traditionally, OIG’s annual Work Plan has given health care providers a preview of OIG’s enforcement priorities. With the OIG now making updates to its Work Plan on a monthly basis, providers stand to gain even more insight into how the focus of OIG is constantly shifting in order to assist in the identification of significant compliance risk areas.

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Implementation of Private Payer Parity Laws for Telehealth Services

Private payer parity laws generally require private insurers and health maintenance organizations to cover, and in some cases also reimburse, for the provision of telehealth services in the same manner and at the same level as comparable in-person services. These laws are enacted at the state level, creating a complicated framework within which insurers must operate. At this point, most states have implemented some form of private payer parity law, although the specifics of each state’s laws vary. One of the most common is a rule such as Montana’s, which requires insurers to offer coverage for health care services provided by a health care provider by means of telemedicine if the services are otherwise covered by the plan. Some states, like Iowa, only mandate parity within their Medicaid programs without extending the mandate to private payers. Other states only require parity for certain types of services, like mental health services in Alaska. Lastly, Illinois and Massachusetts, require parity only when insurers opt to provide telehealth services.

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New Virginia Telehealth Law Benefits Optometrists and Ophthalmologists

After July 1, 2017, optometrists and ophthalmologists (“Ophthalmic Providers”) in Virginia will be able to practice through telehealth. Va. Code § 54.1-2400.01:2 permits Ophthalmic Providers to establish a bona fide provider-patient relationship “by an examination through face-to-face interactive, two-way, real-time communication” or through “store-and-forward technologies.” Licensed Ophthalmic Providers may establish a provider-patient relationship so long as the provider conforms to the in-person standard of care.  To the extent that an Ophthalmic Provider actually writes a prescription, the Ophthalmic Provider must also obtain an updated patient medical history and make a diagnosis at the time of prescribing.  However, like most telehealth laws in other states, the Virginia law prohibits issuing a prescription solely by use of an online questionnaire.

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Momentum Continues in Telehealth Legislative Activity with Passage of Texas Law

Telehealth continues to be a hot topic of state and federal legislatures. Texas, for example, recently joined the rest of the states in no longer requiring initial in-person visits before being able to provide telehealth services.

The Texas legislature enacted the major telehealth bill SB 1107 on May 19, 2017, and the governor signed the bill into law shortly thereafter on May 27, 2017. As reported in our prior post, Texas had considered that, if passed, this telehealth bill would allow patient-physician relationships to be established via telemedicine without requiring an initial in-person visit. Prior guidance from Texas Medical Board required an in-person physician-patient interaction before a visit via telehealth, specifically in prescribing medication. The Texas Medical Board’s telemedicine FAQs are being revised as a result of this enacted law.

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An Investor’s Insight into Telehealth

At the American Telemedicine Association’s (“ATA”) recent conference in Orlando, a panel of strategic investors discussed the growth of the telehealth industry. The panel delved into topics such as the driving forces for telehealth and which telehealth programs they believe have the ability to gain traction across a broad universe of stakeholders. Based on firsthand experience with deals that have worked, and those that have not, the panel shared their insights and discussed lessons learned, which in turn provided listeners with interesting insight regarding the future of the telehealth industry.

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Telehealth Outlook Under the Trump Administration

What will the telehealth landscape look like under the Donald J. Trump Administration?

The Trump Administration is likely to drive telehealth advancement in a positive direction. For example, President Trump’s plan to reform the Veteran’s Affairs Department includes improved patient care through the use of telehealth technology. There are also some indications that the newly confirmed Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”), Tom Price, is “telehealth friendly.” Recently, during the congressional confirmation hearings, Price mentioned a tele-stroke program in Georgia as a model of success, and he said he thought there were many things that can be done to mirror that kind of technological expansion. Price also said he is interested in promoting telehealth because it “holds great promise, particularly for rural areas experiencing physician shortages and for patients with limited mobility.”

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