Tag Archives: technology

Washington State’s Paid Family and Medical Leave Law to Replace State’s Unpaid Family Leave Law; Premium Collections Begin

Washington State has begun implementing its new Paid Family & Medical Leave program (“PFML”). Other states, such as New Jersey, New York, and Rhode Island already have paid family and medical leave programs in place, and now Washington, Massachusetts and Washington, D.C. are set to join them over the next few years. Although the benefits portion of Washington’s program does not kick in until 2020, employers’ reporting and remitting of premiums for Quarters 1 and 2 are due between July 1 and July 31, 2019.

Read more

Read full article

Washington State Poised to Enacted Salary History Ban, Require Pay Bands

In an attempt to reduce the gender wage gap, the Washington State Legislature passed HB 1696,(“the Bill”), legislation that will prevent all private employers in Washington State from inquiring into the salary history of prospective employees  or requiring that an applicant’s prior wage or salary history meet certain criteria.  Additionally, the Bill mandates that, upon an applicant’s request, an employer with 15 or more employees must provide the applicant with certain details about the pay rate or salary range for the open position.

Read more

Read full article

Stuart Gerson on How a Preemptive National Breach Law Can Protect Data Privacy

Our colleague Stuart Gerson recently authored an article in the Washington Legal Foundation’s Legal Backgrounder that will be of particular interest to our readers focused on privacy and cybersecurity: “Federal Preemption: An Essential Component of an Effective National Data-Security and Privacy Regime.”

Read more

Read full article

Earned Sick Leave Poster Is Now Available for Westchester Employers

As we recently reported, New York’s Westchester County has published on its website Employer and Employee FAQs, along with a Notice of Rights to Employees, concerning the county’s Earned Sick Leave Law, which became effective on April 10, 2019. The county has now issued the required poster. Covered employers can download the poster and display it in a conspicuous location at their office or facility.

Read more

Read full article

How Will New York City’s Sexual Harassment Act Effect Contractors?

A Trending News video has been posted now that the Stop Sexual Harassment in NYC Act is in effect. New York employers must provide annual anti-harassment training for their workers, and there are specific rules that apply to independent contractors. Contractors shouldn’t be harassed, and they can also create exposure if they engage in harassment. As a reminder to NYC employers: Don’t forget your contractors!

Read more

Read full article

Predictive Scheduling is Becoming the New Normal for Hospitality and Retail Industry

Taking the guesswork out of scheduling for wage workers is an attractive proposition for regulators. Laws that require employers to publish employee work schedules a certain amount of time in advance so that employees (especially those in the hospitality and retail industries) can have greater flexibility and work-time predictability to deal with family and other events and responsibilities are becoming more common in several cities, and the state of Oregon currently has predictive scheduling laws on the books, and the trend is growing, with proposed legislation in many jurisdictions across the country.

Read more

Read full article

Take 5 Newsletter – The Future of Work: Five Developing Trends for Technology, Media, and Telecommunications Employers

Technology, media, and telecommunications organizations are at the forefront of tackling new challenges in handling employee information and managing employee populations. As legislatures (from the federal level down to states and cities) address how technology impacts today’s new workforce, employers must grapple with changes in managing data—from privacy concerns to the use of artificial intelligence in employment matters—and keeping workers happy, including dealing with wage increases, the rise in union activity, and contingent workers in the #MeToo era. A changing workplace landscape requires creative thinking and outside-the-box solutions.

Read more

Read full article

Washington State Considers Comprehensive Data Privacy Act to Protect Personal Information

Washington State is considering sweeping legislation (SB 5376) to govern the security and privacy of personal data similar to the requirements of the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”). Under the proposed legislation, Washington residents will gain comprehensive rights in their personal data. Residents will have the right, subject to certain exceptions, to request that data errors be corrected, to withdraw consent to continued processing and to deletion of their data. Residents may require an organization to confirm whether it is processing their personal information and to receive a copy of their personal data in electronic form.

Read more

Read full article

Illinois Supreme Court Declares “Aggrieved” Under BIPA Includes Those with No Injury

As we previously reported, since 2017 employees have filed dozens of employment class actions claiming violations of Illinois’ 2008 Biometric Information Privacy Act (“BIPA”). In short, BIPA protects the privacy rights of employees, customers, and others in Illinois against the improper collection, usage, storage, transmission, and destruction of biometric information, including biometric identifiers, such as retina or iris scans, fingerprints, voiceprints, and scans of face or hand geometry. Before collecting such biometric information, BIPA requires an entity to: (1) provide written notice to each individual of the collection; (2) obtain a signed release from each individual for the collection of biometric data; and (3) make available a policy that contains a retention schedule and guidelines for the permanent destruction of the biometric data.

Read more

Read full article

Mandatory Paid Personal Time Law Proposed in New York City

On January 9, 2019, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced his plan to make New York City the first city in the country to mandate that private sector employers provide paid personal time (“PPT”) for their employees. Under the proposal, employers with five or more employees would be required to grant their employees 10 days of PPT to use for any purpose, including vacation, religious observance, bereavement, or simply to spend time with their families. It is unclear whether the proposed legislation would apply to only full-time workers, or whether, similar to the Earned Safe and Sick Time Act(“ESSTA”), it would include many part-time employees as well. The Mayor said he would work with the New York City Council to develop the legislation, and several Council members have already voiced their support for the proposal. …

Read more

Read full article