Tag Archives: product liability litigation

Hall & Wilcox lawyers named as 2019 Best Lawyers in Australia

Leading independent business law firm Hall & Wilcox is pleased to announce 36 lawyers have been recognised in the 2019 Best Lawyers in Australia list as published in today’s Australian Financial Review.

Read more

Read full article

The Economic Loss Rule: An Under-Utilized But Not-So-Secret Weapon

In a decision issued on March 7, 2013, the Supreme Court of Florida reaffirmed Florida’s commitment to adherence to the economic loss rule in product liability litigation. In Tiara Condominium Association, Inc. v. Marsh & McLennan Companies, Inc. etc., et al., No. SC10-1022, the high court provides a helpful discussion of the origin and development of the economic loss rule. In summary, the economic loss rule is described as “the fundamental boundary between contract law, which is designed to enforce the expectancy interests of the parties, and tort law, which imposes a duty of reasonable care and thereby encourages citizens to avoid causing physical harm to others.” Thus, economic loss has been defined by Florida courts as “damage for inadequate value, costs of repair and replacement of the defective product, or consequent loss of profits – without any claim of personal injury or damage to other property.” In other words, economic losses are “disappointed economic expectations,” which are protected by contract law, rather than tort law.

Read full article

Ex Parte Communication With Plaintiff’s Prescribing Physician

In product liability litigation, a single tactical advantage may determine whether the case is won or lost. Often, being able to anticipate an issue before it arises and addressing it in the Case Management Order may be critical.  This is particularly the case  in pharmaceutical mass tort litigation.

In pharmaceutical product liability cases, the plaintiff’s treating physician is a critically important witness. If one of the parties in the case  is permitted to “woodshed” the treating physician, it gives that party an enormous tactical advantage.  

For example, if only the plaintiff’s’ attorney can interview the treating physician and is able to control what information that the physician is able to see, such as defendants internal documents, plaintiff may have an enormous advantage when the physician’s deposition takes place. The physician’s opinion at deposition concerning whether a drug’s prescribing information provided an adequate warning may well be influenced by his prior review of internal company documents that she never would have seen but for review of those documents with her patient’s lawyer.

Read full article