Tag Archives: Paul DeCamp

Connecticut Likely To Become Latest State to Adopt $15 Minimum Wage

Connecticut appears poised to become the next state to raise its minimum wage to $15 per hour, following the trend set by California, Illinois, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, and most recently Maryland, in addition to numerous local jurisdictions.  Governor Ed Lamont is expected to sign H.B. 5004, which passed the state’s House and Senate earlier this month.

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Take 5 Newsletter – Prepping for Full Compliance! Five Important Legal Compliance Issues

Hospitality remains at the forefront of demanding industries where employers must be ever vigilant in their efforts to ensure full compliance with federal, state, and local employment laws and regulations. We highlight below five new or upcoming areas on which employers should focus.

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Employment Law This Week®: EEOC Pay Data Deadline, Class Arbitration Ruling, Scope of Title VII, Marijuana Drug Test Ban, “Wage Theft” Hearing

This Employment Law This Week® Monthly Rundown discusses the most important developments for employers heading into May 2019.

First up this month, the confusion is over for employers. EEO-1 pay data does not need to be submitted to the EEOC by the end of the month. In what may be the final chapter of the EEO-1 pay data reporting issue, a federal judge in Washington, D.C., ruled that the deadline would be postponed until September 30, 2019. Our colleague Robert J. O’Hara shares his insights in this month’s episode.

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ILN Today Post

Epstein Becker Green Recognized Among Leading Law Firms and Attorneys in 2019 Edition of Chambers USA

Epstein Becker Green (EBG) is pleased to announce that the firm has received high rankings in the following practice areas in the 2019 edition of Chambers USA: America’s Leading Lawyers for Business:

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DOL Issues Proposed Overtime Rule – Employment Law This Week

A Trending News interview from Employment Law This Week: New Proposed Overtime Rule.

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U.S. Department of Labor Updates Its Guidance on “Side Work” and the FLSA’s Tip Credit

As we previously shared in this blog, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division (“WHD”) issued an opinion letter in November 2018 changing the Department’s position regarding whether and when an employer with tipped employees, such as a restaurant, can pay an employee a tipped wage less than the federal minimum wage.

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DOL Names New Acting Wage and Hour Administrator

On February 1, 2019, the U.S. Department of Labor publicly designated Keith Sonderling as Acting Administrator of the Wage and Hour Division (“WHD”).  He joined WHD in September 2017 as a Senior Policy Advisor, receiving a promotion to Deputy Administrator last month.  Before joining the Department, he was a shareholder in the Gunster law firm in West Palm Beach, Florida, where he represented businesses in labor and employment matters.

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DOL Releases New Guidance on Minimum Wage for Tipped Workers – Employment Law This Week

Featured on Employment Law This Week: The Department of Labor (“DOL”) rolls back the 80/20 rule.

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DOL Releases New Guidance on Minimum Wage for Tipped Workers – Employment Law This Week

Featured on Employment Law This Week:  The Department of Labor (“DOL”) rolls back the 80/20 rule.

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U.S. Department of Labor Rescinds Guidance Regarding “Side Work” and the FLSA’s Tip Credit in Restaurants

Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”), employers can satisfy their minimum wage obligations to tipped employees by paying them a tipped wage of as low as $2.13 per hour, so long as the employees earn enough in tips to make up the difference between the tipped wage and the full minimum wage. (Other conditions apply that are not important here.) Back in 1988, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division amended its Field Operations Handbook, the agency’s internal guidance manual for investigators, to include a new requirement the agency sought to apply to restaurants. Under that then-new guidance, when tipped employees spend more than 20% of their working time on tasks that do not specifically generate tips—tasks such as wiping down tables, filling salt and pepper shakers, and rolling silverware into napkins, duties generally referred to in the industry as “side work”—the employer must pay full minimum wage, rather than the lesser tipped wage, for the side work.

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