Tag Archives: minimum wage

New Hampshire Governor Vetoes $12 Minimum Wage Bill

At a time when many states and localities are increasing the minimum wage, New Hampshire’s Senate passed a bill that would increase the state’s minimum wage to $12 per hour by 2022.  The very next day, New Hampshire Governor Chris Sununu vetoed the bill. In doing so, Governor Sununu issued a veto message that said the bill would have a “detrimental effect” on the state’s residents and would lead to lost jobs, reduced hours, and less money in the pockets of employees.

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New York State Passes Bill Allowing Employees to Place a Lien on Employer’s Property for Accusation of Wage Violations

The New York State Assembly and Senate have passed a potentially groundbreaking act (S2844B/A486B) (the “Act”) that would allow current or former employees to obtain liens on their employer’s personal and real property based upon only the mere accusation of wage violations.  And it arguably would allow those employees to obtain liens against individuals, including owners, managers and supervisors.

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Maryland Law Bars Enforcement of Non-Compete Agreements Against Low Wage Workers

Maryland recently joined the ranks of states with laws limiting the enforcement of non-compete agreements against low wage workers.  Maryland’s recently enacted law (SB 328) bars employers from enforcing non-compete agreements against workers earning less than or equal to $15 per hour or $31,200 per annum.

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Connecticut Likely To Become Latest State to Adopt $15 Minimum Wage

Connecticut appears poised to become the next state to raise its minimum wage to $15 per hour, following the trend set by California, Illinois, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, and most recently Maryland, in addition to numerous local jurisdictions.  Governor Ed Lamont is expected to sign H.B. 5004, which passed the state’s House and Senate earlier this month.

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Ninth Circuit Concludes That New California “ABC” Independent Contractor Test Applies Retroactively

In April 2018, the California Supreme Court issued its long-awaited opinion in Dynamex Operations West, Inc. v. Superior Court, dramatically changing the standard for determining whether workers in California should be classified as employees or as independent contractors for purposes of the wage orders adopted by California’s Industrial Welfare Commission (“IWC”). In so doing, the Court held that there is a presumption that individuals are employees, and that an entity classifying an individual as an independent contractor bears the burden of establishing that such a classification is proper under the “ABC test” used in some other jurisdictions.

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Maryland General Assembly Overrides Veto to Enact Bill Increasing Minimum Wage to $15

On March 22, 2019, we wrote that the two houses of the Maryland General Assembly had agreed on a conference report adopting the Senate’s version of a bill that would increase the state-wide minimum wage to $15 by 2025 or 2026, depending on the size of the company, with two minor changes. We also discussed the bill on March 18, 2019.

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Maryland Poised to Increase Minimum Wage to $15

Maryland appears poised to increase its minimum wage to $15 per hour over the next few years, joining California, Illinois, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, and various local jurisdictions, including its own Montgomery County and neighboring District of Columbia.

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DOL Issues Proposed Overtime Rule – Employment Law This Week

A Trending News interview from Employment Law This Week: New Proposed Overtime Rule.

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New DOL Opinion Letters Address State Law Residential Janitor Exemption and Participation in an Employer’s Optional Volunteer Program

On March 14, 2019, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division (“WHD”) released two opinion letters concerning the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”). One letter addresses the interplay between New York State’s overtime exemption for residential janitors (colloquially referred to as apartment “supers”) and the FLSA, which does not exempt such employees, and the other addresses whether time spent participating in an employer’s optional volunteer program constitutes “hours worked” requiring compensation under the FLSA.

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New York State Department of Labor Scraps Proposed “Call-In Pay” Regulations – For Now

On March 1, 2019, the New York State Department of Labor (NYSDOL) announced that it is no longer pursuing predictive scheduling regulations (or “call-in pay”) that would have affected most employers in the state. For the time being, New York employers do not have to worry about pending statewide regulations regarding call-in pay. Keep in mind, however, that New York City employers are still subject to the Fair Workweek Law.

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