Tag Archives: Howard Gerver

HR Tech and People Analytics: An Interview with Howard Gerver, President and Founder HR Best Practices

Howard Gerver is a self-proclaimed human capital data geek.  His “day job” specializes in finding innovative and practical ways to save money by identifying “golden nuggets” mined from Big HR Data sets, such as claims and human capital data.  A lot of this work includes analytics, claim auditing and eligibility auditing.  His “nights and weekend” job focuses on helping clients leverage their HR, Benefits, Leave and Time & Attendance data to help improve compliance with the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare).   Throughout his career, he has focused on improving the financial performance of the Payroll, Human Resources and Benefits functions of his clients through advanced technology, process improvement and auditing. In his spare time, he researches new and exciting ways to use Big HR Data to address broader business issues vis-à-vis predictive analytics.

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ACA Information Reporting: Ensuring Big Data Analyses Do Not Lead to Big Penalties

By Michelle Capezza (Member of the Firm, Epstein Becker Green) and Howard Gerver (President, ACA Managed Services)

As employers prepare the Affordable Care Act information reporting filings for the 2016 year that will be due in 2017 (notably the 1094/1095 B&C), the good faith standard of compliance, and the potential for inaccuracies, is no longer available.  In order to seek a waiver of penalties for the 2016 filings made in 2017, an employer will need to meet a standard of reasonable cause and no willful neglect.  With this standard, an employer must show that there are significant mitigating factors or the failure was due to certain events outside their control and the filer acted responsibly.  While “responsibly” remains subjective, the employer must be able to demonstrate that the same level of quality assurance and audit rigor that is applied to other governmental reporting must be applied to the 1095 and 1094 IRS reporting processes. Also, at this time, anticipate that the filings will need to be made with the government, and to the employees (and other recipients), under the regular schedule without extensions: (i.e., the disclosures to employees will be due the last day of January following the calendar year in which coverage was provided; forms must be filed with the IRS by the last day of February if filing on paper or March if filing electronically (which is required for employers with 250 plus returns)).

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