Tag Archives: HazCom

EHS Today Article: HazCom Gets a Facelift

Last week, EHS Today Magazine ran our article in which we delve into more detail about OSHA’s amended Hazard Communication Rule (“HazCom”), and the integration of the United Nations’ Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (“GHS”).  Check out the full article here, in which we detailed 10 important things employers need to know about the final HazCom Rule.  Here’s the short list:

  1. New Hazard Classification Criteria
  2. New Method for Evaluating Mixtures
  3. Amended Label Requirements
  4. Proscrictive Format for Safety Data Sheet
  5. Inclusion of Non-Mandatory Threshold Limit Values in SDSs
  6. Information and Training Requirements
  7. Other Effective Dates
  8. Inclusion of a Category of Hazards Not Otherwise Classified
  9. No Preemption of State Tort Laws
  10. Covers Combustible Dust Without Clarity

The article expands on our post here last month with a brief summary of the new HazCom rule.

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New HazCom Standard: The Most Frequently Cited Standard in the Hospitality Industry Gets a Facelift

By Eric J. Conn and Casey M. Cosentino

For years, OSHA’s Hazard Communication Standard (“HazCom”) has been the most standard most frequently cited against hotel and other hospitality employers.

In FY 2011 37 hotel companies were cited for violations of the HazCom Standard, including, primarily, alleged failures to:

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GHS & HazCom: 10 Things Employers Must Know About OSHA’s New Hazard Communication Standard

By Eric J. Conn and Casey M. Cosentino

Following a March 20, 2012 Press Release, on March 26, 2012, OSHA issued its much anticipated final Hazard Communication Rule (“HazCom”), which integrates the United Nations’ Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (“GHS”) into OSHA’s old Hazard Communication Standard (“HazCom” or “HCS”).  The new HazCom Standard requires employers to classify chemicals according to their health and physical hazards, and to adopt new, consistent formats for labels and Safety Data Sheets (“SDS’s”) for all chemicals manufactured or imported in the United States.  According to Assistant Secretary Michaels, “OSHA’s 1983 Hazard Communication Standard gave workers the right to know . . . this update will give them the right to understand.”

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