Tag Archives: European Court of Justice

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Større beskyttelse af lønmodtagere ved virksomhedsoverdragelser

Højesteret har den 17. oktober 2017 afsagt en dom, der udvider lønmodtageres beskyttelse mod usaglig opsigelse i forbindelse med virksomhedsoverdragelse. Dommen og dennes konsekvenser er temaet for denne artikel.

Hidtidig retsopfattelse
Siden den 1. april 1979 har det fremgået af virksomhedsoverdragelseslovens (vol.) § 3, stk. 1, at afskedigelse på grund af overdragelse af en virksomhed ikke anses for rimeligt begrundet i virksomhedens forhold, medmindre afskedigelsen skyldes økonomiske, tekniske eller organisatoriske årsager, der medfører beskæftigelsesmæssige ændringer.

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VAT on public-purpose investments: property developers can breathe a sigh of relief

In 2009 the Supreme Court made it clear that the VAT on public-purpose investments related to property developments is deductible if it would not be possible to implement the development without such investment. Recently, however, some alarm was unexpectedly caused by the preliminary opinion of the advocate general of the European Court of Justice (ECJ) in a similar, Bulgarian case, which recommended prohibiting the tax deduction right. Although the ECJ’s judgement published in the middle of last week did not follow the advocate general’s opinion, it did make exercising the deduction right subject to some strict conditions.

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EU-Domstolen afviser forpligtelse til at offentliggøre evalueringsmetode ved licitationer efter tilbudsloven

EU-Domstolen har taget stilling til, hvorvidt ordregiver er forpligtet til at offentliggøre sin evalueringsmetode i udbudsmaterialet.

EU-Domstolen har den 14. juli 2016 i sagen C-6/15, TNS Dimarso NV mod Vlaams Gewest, taget stilling til, hvorvidt ordregiver er forpligtet til at offentliggøre sin evalueringsmetode i udbudsmaterialet.

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Religious Symbols in the Workplace

The European Court of Justice (ECJ) recently heard the case of Achbita v G4S Secure Solutions, a Belgian case concerning a Muslim woman who was dismissed for refusing to remove her headscarf at work. She claimed unfair dismissal and discrimination on the grounds of religion or belief.

This is the first such case of religious discrimination which has reached the ECJ and has been widely reported due to the sensitive and topical issues raised. Last week the Advocate General gave her opinion which, while not the decision of the court, may give an indication of how the court may find.

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Transfers of Personal Dada to the USA – Cancellation of European Commission Decision 2000/520/EC

Transfers of personal data from EU member states to the USA were affected by a recent decision of the European Court of Justice (ECJ) regarding the Safe Harbour programme for the transfer of personal data from the EU to the USA. The European Court of Justice decided in case C-362/14 (Maximilian Schrems v. Data Protection Commissioner, Ireland) that Commission Decision 2000/520/EC on the adequacy of the protection provided by the safe harbour privacy principles for transfers of personal data to the USA is invalid.

This means that if personal data is transferred from any EU member state to the USA on the basis of the above mentioned Commission Decision, the process must be reassessed in accordance with the local legislation on personal data protection. For example, the Czech Office already published its recommendation in connection with the ECJ decision in the Schrems case. Even before the ECJ decision, it was recommended consulting each case of the transfer of personal data based on safe harbour principles to the USA with the competent local authority before the transfer.

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Levelling the playing field

European Court signals change to territorial rules for broadcasters and download content providers
04/10/2011

The European Court of Justice (ECJ) today gave its judgment in cases brought by the FA Premier League (FAPL) and its licensing partners against the sellers and users of satellite TV decoder cards shipped from Greece to the UK and used in British pubs to screen live Premier League games.

The ECJ, in a sweeping judgment, ruled that the FAPL could not prevent UK users from buying decoder cards in other European countries, and held that contract terms which the FAPL had with all its European broadcasters, and which tightly enforced territoriality, were unlawful and unenforceable.

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