Tag Archives: Epstein Becker & Green

NLRB GC Issues Memo on Workplace Policies – Employment Law This Week

Featured on Employment Law This Week: General Counsel Peter Robb has issued a memo to National Labor Relations Board regional directors that offers guidance in applying the Board’s Boeing decision when considering the legality of rules.

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Law Urging DEA to Promulgate Rules for “Special Registration” Likely This Summer

At first blush, the passage of House Bill 5483, entitled the “Special Registration for Telemedicine Clarification Act of 2018” (the “Bill”), appears to address the issue concerning the lack of regulatory guidance regarding the “Special Registration” exception to the Ryan Haight Act of 2008; however, a deeper and more careful analysis reveals that the Bill may not be as effective as most health care practitioners may hope. The Bill, sponsored by Rep. Carter (R-Georgia), a pharmacist, Rep. Bustos (D-Illinois), and nine others, cleared the House on June 12, 2018 without objection. The Bill would require the federal Drug Enforcement Agency (“DEA”) to promulgate rules that would allow health care providers to apply for a “Special Registration” that would allow a provider to prescribe controlled substances via telehealth without first conducting an initial in-person examination of the patient. A transcript of the testimony in support of the Bill (“Transcript”) reveals enthusiasm by the sponsors of the Bill, as well as by Representatives Pallone (D-New Jersey) and Walden (R-Oregon), who called the Bill “a commonsense measure that cuts through the red tape to provide more treatment options to underserved communities through the use of telemedicine.” While Section 413 of the current version of S.B. 2680 would only give the DEA six months to promulgate such rules, the two bills are very similar and almost guarantee that a law will be signed in the coming months that will require DEA to promulgate rules that will finally create a Special Registration exception to the Ryan Haight Act. While the prospect of rules implementing the Special Registration may be exciting for many practitioners, it should be noted that the DEA has been obligated to create these regulations, and has ignored this obligation, for a decade.

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Welcome WCAG 2.1 – Website Accessibility Guidelines Have Been Refreshed

Our colleague  at Epstein Becker Green has a post on the Hospitality Labor and Employment Law blog that will be of interest to our readers in the financial services industry: “The Generally Prevailing Website Accessibility Guidelines Have Been Refreshed – It’s Time to Officially Welcome WCAG 2.1.”

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ILN Today Post

Employment Law This Week®

Arbitration Agreement Enforcement, Maryland’s #MeToo Legislation, California’s National Origin Regulations

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VA Leads in Changing the Telehealth Landscape

Effective June 11, 2018, all Department of Veterans Affairs (“VA”) health care providers will be able to offer the same level of care to all beneficiaries regardless of the beneficiary’s or the health care provider’s location. In its recently released final rule, the VA stated that in December 2016 Congress mandated that the agency provide veterans with a self-scheduling, online appointment system, and that the agency meet the demands for the provision of health care services to veterans, regardless of whether such care was provided in-person or using telehealth technologies. As a general rule, most telehealth practitioners are required to comply with various and state-specific licensing, registration, and certification requirements in order to render health care services via telehealth. Failure to do so can potentially jeopardize a practitioner’s professional credentials and could expose them to penalties including fines and imprisonment for the unauthorized practice of medicine or other health care services. These state-specific requirements create certain challenges for telehealth practitioners seeking to practice across state lines.

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The Catch-22 Of Litigating Your Trade Secrets Case Without Revealing The Secrets Themselves

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jim Flynn, an attorney in Epstein Becker & Green’s Newark, New Jersey office, recently addressed in separate forums the delicate balance that trade secret owners and their counsel must strike when litigating over trade secrets and confidential information. First, Mr. Flynn moderated a panel discussion among trade secret litigators (including one from Beijing) at the American Intellectual Property Law Association (“AIPLA”) Spring Meeting in Seattle, Washington. His May 16th AIPLA session was entitled “A Litigator’s Guide to Protecting Trade Secrets During Litigation,” and program materials included his written paper on the Catch-22 aspects noted above. Additionally, Mr. Flynn published on May 23, 2018 an International Lawyers Network IP Insider article entitled The Catch-22 Of Litigating Your Trade Secrets Case Without Revealing The Secrets Themselves that addressed these topics in further detail.   As he pointed out in that article:

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Supreme Court Gives Employers “Epic” Win: Upholding Class Action Waivers in Arbitration Agreements and Rejecting Obama NLRB

In Epic Systems Corp. v. Lewis  (a companion case to NLRB v. Murphy Oil USA and Ernst & Young v. Morris), the U.S. Supreme Court finally and decisively put to rest the Obama-era NLRB’s aggressive contention that the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) prevented class action waiver in employees arbitration agreements, finding such waivers are both protected by the Federal Arbitration Act (FAA) and not prohibited by the NLRA. In its 5-4 decision, the Court explained that the NLRB’s interpretation of the FAA was not entitled to deference because it is not the agency charged by Congress with the interpretation and enforcement of that statute.

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ILN Today Post

Overtime Exemptions, Predictive Scheduling, Sex Harassment, and More: Major Developments on Some Key Issues Affecting Retail Employers

Spring may have been slow to arrive in some parts of the country this year, but the courts, state legislatures, and government agencies have been moving full speed ahead. In April, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a potentially game-changing decision in which it rejected the principle that courts should narrowly construe exemptions under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”). On the heels of new “predictive scheduling” laws in New York City, the New York State Department of Labor issued its own proposed—and, in some ways, more exacting—rules on the matter. The New York State Legislature has been busy as well, enacting sexual harassment laws that impose significant new burdens on employers, including an annual training requirement. In addition, with the threat of workplace violence an ever-present concern, we provide some concrete guidance on how to manage and minimize the risks to your business. Finally, as summer approaches, we assess the impact of the U.S. Department of Labor’s new “primary beneficiary” test on internship programs.

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OIG Finds CMS Overpayments for Telehealth Services

 

 

 

 

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Inspector General (OIG) recently released a report revealing that during OIG’s 2014 and 2015 audits of telehealth claims, more than half of the professional telehealth claims paid by the Medicare program did not have matching originating-site facility claims.

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Healing the Healers: Preventing Workplace Violence in Health Care Settings

Our colleagues, , at Epstein Becker Green, has a post on the Health Employment and Labor blog that will be of interest to many of our readers: “Healing the Healers: Preventing Workplace Violence in Health Care Settings.”

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