Tag Archives: Epstein Becker & Green

David Clark Quoted in “Did Your Doctor Disappear Without a Word? A Noncompete Clause Could Be the Reason”

David J. Clark, Member of the Firm in the Litigation and Employment, Labor & Workforce Management practices, in the firm’s New York office, was quoted in The New York Times, in “Did Your Doctor Disappear Without a Word? A Noncompete Clause Could Be the Reason,” by Michelle Andrews. (Read the full version – subscription required.)

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“…For me? As what? Tough guy? I don’t need tough guys. I need more lawyers…”: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW IN CRIMINAL MATTERS

There is a popular vintage Harley Davidson t-shirt that says “Tough Guys Finish First.”  That may be true.  But, sometimes, to finish first, one does not need more tough guys; one needs more lawyers, as a crime-related matter involving the Mongols Motor Cycle Club has recently shown.  So today we thought that we would use Michael Corleone’s observation as the title of our discussion of how creative intellectual property lawyering has impacted that recent Mongols’ matter in a California federal court.  [Not only is the Corleone quote apt here, but it is often useful in any context to start with a quote from The Godfather, which has been described as the “sum of all wisdoms” and “the source of all knowledge.”  So it is probably fitting that we lead this piece (or any piece) with a Godfather quote or reference, especially since it has worked for us before.]

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OIG Evaluates Remote Patient Monitoring Arrangement

The Office of Inspector General (“OIG”) for the Department of Health and Human Services recently issued an Advisory Opinion that provides insight into how the agency evaluates arrangements that deal with the integration of technology, medicine, and patient monitoring under the federal Anti-Kickback Statute (“AKS”). In Advisory Opinion No. 19-02, OIG evaluated whether a pharmaceutical manufacturer could temporarily loan a limited-functionality smartphone to financially needy patients enrolled in federal health care programs. OIG concluded that the proposed arrangement could violate federal health care fraud laws but OIG would not impose civil monetary penalties or administrative sanctions in light of the purpose of the arrangement and certain safeguards in place. This Advisory Opinion related to the promotion of remote patient monitoring and is useful to telehealth providers and other pharmaceutical manufacturers to evaluate how OIG might analyze similar arrangements.

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ILN Today Post

SCOTUS Today: Circuit Split Over Salary History Gets a Temporary Pass – but Expect Future Challenges

The Court’s per curiam opinion in Yovino v. Rizo—holding that the Ninth Circuit erred in counting the votes of Judge Stephen Reinhart as to judgments that were issued after he had died—will get a lot of attention in light of its resolution of the issue of what constitutes a judge being in active service, an opinion concluding with the informative and pithy line: “But federal judges are appointed for life, not for eternity.” In the here and how, however, this decision has immediate consequences, particularly for those who practice in the area of labor and employment of law.

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Race Discrimination on the Basis of Hair Is Illegal in NYC

The New York City Commission on Human Rights published legal enforcement guidance defining an individual’s right to wear “natural hair, treated or untreated hairstyles such a locs, cornrows, twists, braids, Bantu knots, fades, Afros, and/or the right to keep hair in an uncut or untrimmed state.”   The guidance applies to workplace grooming and appearance policies “that ban, limit, or otherwise restrict natural hair or hairstyles”:

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ILN Today Post

Epstein Becker Green Welcomes Robert J. O’Hara to Employment, Labor & Workforce Management Practice

Epstein Becker Green (EBG) is pleased to announce that Robert J. O’Hara, an experienced employment attorney and senior HR executive, has joined as a Member of the Firm in the Employment, Labor & Workforce Management practice, in its New York office. For nearly two decades before joining EBG, Mr. O’Hara managed employment law and human resources compliance for United Technologies Corporation, a global Fortune 50 company with more than 225,000 employees in 150 countries.

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Remote Prescribing Trends in Telehealth

The telehealth industry has experienced constant developments in the regulatory landscape at both the federal and state level over the past several years, and we are confident these changes will continue into 2019 as the utilization of telehealth services continues to evolve and mature. A notable area of activity is how regulators are approaching the telehealth industry, in particular remote prescribing applications of this platform.

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DOJ Considers Opioid Use Disorder an ADA Covered Disability and Pursues Claims Against a Provider for Refusing Medical Services to Opioid Users

The U.S. Department of Justice reached a January 31, 2019 settlement of an American with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) Title III complaint against health care provider Selma Medical Associates relating to provision of medical services to an individual with opioid use disorder (“OUD”).  The settlement is notable for health care providers and employers as it makes clear that DOJ considers OUD as a disability under the ADA thereby triggering the full panoply of ADA rights for those with OUD.

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Seventh Circuit Holds External Job Applicants Cannot Pursue Disparate Impact Claims Under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act

In a major decision sure to provoke controversy and legislative attempts to overrule it, the en banc Seventh Circuit, by a vote of 8 to 4, has held in Kleber v. CareFusion Corp., (No. 17-1206, Jan 23, 2019), that Section 4(a)(2) of the federal Age Discrimination In Employment Act (“ADEA”) does not provide rejected external applicants with a cause of action.

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NLRB Replaces Its Test for Distinguishing Between Employees and Independent Contractors – Returns to Pre-2014 Common Law Based Test

In a three to one decision issued on January 25, 2019, the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB” or the “Board”) in SuperShuttle DFW, Inc., 367 NLRB No.75 (2019), the Board announced it was rejecting the test adopted in 2014 in FedEx Home Delivery, 361 NLRB 610 (2014) for determining whether a worker was an employee or an independent contractor and returning to the test it used prior to the FedEx Home decision.

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