Tag Archives: energy law

ILN Today Post

ILN-ergy | PART ONE PEAK OIL – Are We There Yet?

ILNergyPART ONE | PEAK OIL – Are We There Yet?
Oil and Natural Gas Boom and Bust Cycles and Their Impact On The Practice of Law

Houston, Texas, is considered by many as the energy capital of the world, certainly in respect to the oil and gas industry. Over the decades, this region has experienced several boom and bust cycles dictated by the ebb and flow of the supply and demand of oil and natural gas. Each cycle has in turn predictably impacted the legal profession servicing this sector. Presently, the industry is experiencing a bust cycle. While we are seeing some of the same trends during this present bust, there are also signs that history might not be as good an indicator of future trends as it once was. Part One of this article briefly discusses the business environment which was largely the cause of the recent boom in oil and gas prices and resultant increases in production, as well as some of the reasons for the current bust. Part Two will explore how this cycle is having or is expected to have an impact on the legal profession, and also examine ways in which these impacts might be different than experienced during prior cycles. More…

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ILN Today Post

Ontario’s Mineral Development Strategy

The Ontario government recently published a Discussion Paper on Renewing Ontario’s Mineral Development Strategy. The document is available on the Ministry of Northern Development and Mines website: http://www.mndm.gov.on.ca/en/mines-and-minerals/mineral-development-strategy.

The Discussion Paper is described as a “first step in the development of a renewed mineral development strategy for Ontario.” The Discussion Paper notes progress made since the launch of the government’s 2006 mineral development strategy, particularly the enactment of an amended Mining Act in 2009, which recognized and affirmed existing Aboriginal and treaty rights in section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982, including the duty to consult with Aboriginal communities and to minimize the impact of mining activities on public health and safety and the environment. More…

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THE CONVENTION ON SUPPLEMENTARY COMPENSATION (CSC) FOR NUCLEAR LIABILITY IN FORCE APRIL 15, 2015 IMPORTANT IMPLICATIONS FOR NUCLEAR OPERATORS AND SUPPLIERS

With Japan having submitted its instrument of ratification to the International Atomic Energy Agency, the CSC will come into force on April 15, 2015. This has significant implications for cross-border nuclear liability and it creates another layer of financial protection for the public in addition to that provided by financial security required under the domestic law of the country of origin of the nuclear incident. Ratifying countries will need to contribute to a fund of 300 million special drawing rights (an SDR is about $1.50 U.S.) for contingent liability coverage for a nuclear incident in a CSC member state. More…

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CYBERSECURITY IN THE ENERGY AGE

Beirne, Maynard & Parsons partner Scott D. Marrs and founding partner Martin D. Beirne look at the prevalence of cybersecurity attacks in the energy sector and how energy companies can implement cybersecurity best practices to mitigate this underestimated risk. To read the entire article, please access the below pdf.

PDF FileCybersecurity in the Energy Age

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GOVERNMENT APPROVES AMENDMENTS TO THE ELECTRICITY ACT, 2003

The Government of India, on Wednesday December 10, approved amendments to the Electricity Act, 2003 in terms of the amendment bill proposed by the Ministry of Power.

The Ministry of Power had sometime in October 2014 circulated the draft amendments to concerned administrative authorities including the Central Electricity Authority, the Central Electricity Regulatory Commission, and State power generation and transmission utilities for their comments. The proposed amendments are substantially with respect to distribution and supply of electricity by seeking a separation of distribution and supply functions and activities within a specified period, to meet the Government’s objective of allowing consumers to select a power supply company of their choice. Presently, distribution companies while managing the distribution infrastructure to different categories of consumers also act as suppliers of electricity. The draft amendments also seek to impose stiffer penalties for non-compliance with directions of the State and Regional Load Despatch Centres or other orders or directions passed pursuant to the Electricity Act, 2003.

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IT’S THE TECH, STUPID: WHY INNOVATION CAUSED THE $34.6 BILLION HALLIBURTON-BAKER HUGHES DEAL (NOT PLUNGING OIL PRICES)

Texas Lawyer

In a recent article featured in the Texas Lawyer, Beirne, Maynard & Parsons partner Scott D. Marrs looks at how the ever changing technological landscape is a key driver in energy sector consolidations. To read the article, please access the below pdf.

PDF FileView as PDF

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Mexico Has Vast Oil and Gas Reserves, So Why Is It Talking About Importing Oil From Others?

J. Paul Getty once said that the formula for success was to “rise early, work hard, strike oil.” For Mexico, it may be “import oil.” There has been a lot of buzz about Mexico’s vast oil and gas reserves and recent efforts to open its natural resources to foreign investment and development. But something counterintuitive is also occurring. Mexico, the world’s 10th largest crude oil producer, may actually import oil. How can these potentially inconsistent energy policies be reconciled? Simply put, the denationalization process takes time, and foreign energy companies are in the nascent stage of converging on Mexico. Mexico has an immediate need for oil in order to boost production at its refineries. More…

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FEDERAL COURT UPHOLDS DARLINGTON REFURBISHMENT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

Stanley D. Berger B.C.L.,L.L.B, Certified Specialist Environmental Law
On November 25, 2014 the Federal Court of Canada upheld decisions by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) in which these responsible authorities (RA’s), charged with completing an environmental assessment (EA) under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act 1992 c.37 (CEAA) , concluded that Ontario Power Generation’s (OPG) proposal for refurbishing the four nuclear reactors at the Darlington Nuclear generating Facility in Clarington, Ontario would not likely cause significant adverse environmental effects. (decision at 2014 FC 1124.) More…

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FIRST READING COMPLETED ON ONTARIO’S SECURITY FOR COURTS, ELECTRICITY-GENERATING FACILITIES AND NUCLEAR FACILITIES ACT, 2014

Stanley D. Berger, B.C.L., L.L.B, Certified Specialist Environmental Law

Last Thursday, October 30th, first reading of Bill 35, The Security for Courts, Electricity-Generating Facilities and Nuclear Facilities Act carried in the Ontario Legislature. Bill 35, as it concerns the security of the electricity-generating and nuclear facilities, is identical to its predecessor Bill 51, Schedule 3 which received its first reading over a year and a half ago in April 2013. More…

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Connecting to the Grid: BC Sets Rates, Terms for LNG Industry

Today, the BC Government introduced the Domestic Long-Term Sales Contracts Regulation under the Clean Energy Act setting rates and terms for liquefied natural gas (LNG) customers proposing to use electricity from the BC Hydro grid.

LNG proponents will pay $83.02 per megawatt hour (MWh) for electricity delivered at LNG export facilities, plus full cost of connecting to the BC Hydro system plus any transmission system upgrades necessary to serve the facilities.  Compared to $54.34/MWh, being the average rate paid by established industrial customers in the province in 2014.  This is some impressive negotiation by government.

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