Tag Archives: collective bargaining

New York City Temporary Schedule Change Law Impact Employers with Collective Bargaining Agreements – Express Waiver and “Comparable Benefits” Language Will Need To Be Negotiated For Contracts Covering Persons Employed In New York City

The New York City Temporary Schedule Change Law (“Law”), which became effective on July 18, 2018, raises new issues that employers with union represented employees will need to address as their existing collective bargaining agreements (“CBA”) come up for renewal.

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Supreme Court Holds Requiring Public Sector Employees to Pay Representation Fees Is Unconstitutional – Violates Government Employees’ First Amendment Rights

In its long awaited decision in Mark Janus v. American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, the United States Supreme Court clearly and unequivocally held that it is a violation of public employees’ First Amendment rights to require that they pay an “agency fee” to the union that is their collective bargaining representative, to cover their “fair share” of their union representative’s bargaining and contract enforcement expenses. The Janus decision overturns the Court’s own 1977 decision in Abood v. Detroit Board of Education, which had found state and local laws requiring public sector employees to pay such fees to be lawful and constitutional. Commentators expect the decision to have serious economic consequences for unions in the heavily organized public sector.

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NYC Council Passes Bills Establishing Procedures on Flexible Work Schedules and Reasonable Accommodation Requests

Our colleague  at Epstein Becker Green has a post on the Health Employment and Labor blog that will be of interest to our readers in the financial services industry: “New York City Council Passes Bills Establishing Procedures on Flexible Work Schedules and Reasonable Accommodation Requests.”

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NYC Council Passes Bills Establishing Procedures on Flexible Work Schedules and Reasonable Accommodation Requests

Our colleague  at Epstein Becker Green has a post on the Health Employment and Labor blog that will be of interest to our readers in the retail industry: “New York City Council Passes Bills Establishing Procedures on Flexible Work Schedules and Reasonable Accommodation Requests.”

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New York Paid Family Leave Regulations Finalized

Our colleagues , at Epstein Becker Green, have a post on the Retail Labor and Employment Law blog that will be of interest to many of our readers in the hospitality industry: “New York Paid Family Leave Regulations Finalized: How Do They Compare to Prior Versions?

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New York Paid Family Leave Regulations Finalized: How Do They Compare to Prior Versions?

On July 19, 2017, the New York State Workers’ Compensation Board (“WCB” or the “Board”) issued its final regulations (“Final Regulations”) for the New York State Paid Family Leave Benefits Law (“PFLBL” or the “Law”). The WCB first published regulations to the PFLBL in February 2017, and then updated those regulations in May (collectively, the “Prior Regulations”).

While the Final Regulations did clarify some outstanding questions, many questions remain, particularly pertaining to the practical logistics of implementing the Law, such as the tax treatment of deductions and benefits, paystub requirements, certain differences between requirements that pertain to self-funding employers and those employers intending to obtain an insurance policy, and what forms and procedures will apply.

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NLRB Requires Specific Waivers During Bargaining – Employment Law This Week

Featured on the new episode of Employment Law This Week: Employers must have specific waivers to make unilateral policy changes when bargaining with a union.

That’s according to the NLRB, which once again clarified its “clear and unmistakable” waiver standard to restrict employers’ midterm changes. In this case, an employer relied on a broad management rights clause in its contract with the union to make unilateral changes to specific policies. The NLRB found that the union had not waived its right to bargain over those changes because the contract did not refer to the policies with sufficient clarity.

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NLRB Curtails Employers’ Right to Hire Permanent Replacements for Strikers – Bolsters Unions’ Ability to Use Intermittent Strikes

NLRB Curtails Employers’ Right to Hire Permanent Replacements for Strikers – Bolsters Unions’ Ability to Use Intermittent Strikes

The National Labor Relations Board, in a 2-1 decision by Chairman Mark Pearce and Member Kent Hirozawa, in American Baptist Homes of the West, 364 NLRB No. 13, has adopted a new standard for considering the legality of an employer’s hiring of permanent replacements in response to economic strikes. The decision, in the words of Member Philip Miscimarra’s dissent, is not only a “deformation of Board precedent,” but “a substantial rearrangement of the competing interests balanced by Congress when it chose to protect various economic weapons, including the hiring of permanent replacements.”

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Crown Corporation Collective Bargaining and Bill C-60

By Heather Hettiarachchi

On April 29th of this year, the federal government introduced Bill C-60. Division 17 of Bill C-60 makes amendments to the Financial Administration Act and will affect the way in which Crown Corporations engage in collective bargaining.

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What To Know About ACA Collective Bargaining, in Employment Law360

Evan Rosen and Mark M. Trapp of the Labor and Employment practice co-wrote an article titled “What To Know About ACA Collective Bargaining”

Following is an excerpt:

For the unionized employer, the advent of the Affordable Care Act requires careful strategic thought about its impact on upcoming collective bargaining negotiations. Indeed, for companies with a unionized workforce, the ACA poses additional challenges and strategic considerations above and beyond those confronting nonunionized workforces.

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