Tag Archives: Chipotle

Court Green Lights Immediate Appeal Of Chipotle Collective Action Decertification Order Continue Reading…

As noted in earlier postings, in March of this year, a federal judge in New York handed Chipotle Mexican Grill a significant victory, denying a request by salaried management apprentices alleging misclassification as exempt from overtime to certify claims for class action treatment under the laws of six states, as well as granting Chipotle’s motion to decertify an opt-in class of 516 apprentices under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”).  The plaintiffs then sought—and in July 2017 the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit granted—a discretionary interlocutory appeal of the ruling concerning the six state-law putative classes, allowing the plaintiffs to obtain immediate review of that decision under Rule 23(f) of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure rather than waiting until after final judgment in the case to pursue an appeal as of right.

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In Re Chipotle Mexican Grill, Inc.: The Tenth Circuit Permits A Company-Wide FLSA Collective Action To Proceed Under The Spurious Action Approach to Facilitate Notice

In Re Chipotle Mexican Grill, Inc.: The Tenth Circuit Permits A Company-Wide FLSA Collective Action To Proceed Under The Spurious Action Approach to Facilitate Notice

In In re: Chipotle Mexican Grill, Inc., Case No. 17-1028 (10th Cir. March 27, 2017), the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals reiterated its holding in Theissen v. GE Capital Corp., 267 F.3d 1055 (10th Cir. 2001), that a district court may utilize a variety of approaches to identify similarly situated workers for purposes of authorizing facilitated notice in FLSA collective actions.

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New Chipotle Decision Holds That California Employers Need Only Make Meal And Rest Breaks Available

By Michael Kun

Employers with operations in California continue to await a ruling from the California Supreme Court on the question of whether employers must “ensure” that meal and rest breaks are taken, or merely make them “available.”

The issue has long been before the Court in the similarly-named Brinker and Brinkley cases, and will turn largely on a single question: what does the word “provide” mean.

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