Labor & Employment

Video: Pay Data Collection Study, Colorado Non-Compete Restrictions, D.C. Circuit Vacates Browning-FerrisEmployment Law This Week

As featured in #WorkforceWednesday:  This week, we update you on national trends relating to pay data collection, non-compete restrictions, and joint-employment rules.

Read full article

Reminder: Amendments to Colorado Noncompete Law Take Effect Today

As we have previously reported, the Colorado Assembly passed sweeping changes to the state’s noncompete law that, among other things, (1) set compensation floors for enforcement of both noncompetes ($101,250) and customer non-solicitation agreements ($60,750), which will be adjusted annually based on inflation; (2) require a separate, standalone notice to employees before a new or prospective worker accepts an offer of employment, or at least 14 days before the earlier of: (a) the effective date of the restrictions, or (b) the effective date of any additional compensation or changes in the terms or conditions of employment that provide consideration for the restriction, for existing workers; and (3) prohibit the inclusion of out-of-state choice-of-law and venue provisions. Those amendments take effect today, August 10, 2022.

Compliance with these amendments is even more important due to a prior amendment, effective earlier this year, which provides that violations of Colorado’s noncompete law can subject employers to criminal liability (a Class 2 misdemeanor, which carries possible punishment of 120 days in prison, a $750 fine per violation, or both), as well as hefty fines and possible injunctive relief and attorneys’ fees to aggrieved workers.

Read full article

NJDCR Adopts New and Amended Regulations Regarding Required Workplace Posters

On August 1, 2022, the New Jersey Division on Civil Rights (DCR) adopted new and amended regulations concerning the “Display of Official Posters of the Division on Civil Rights,” which require employers, housing providers, and places of public accommodation to prominently display “in places easily visible” to those who would be affected by violations of these laws, posters created by DCR to inform individuals and covered entities of their rights and obligations under the New Jersey Law Against Discrimination (LAD) and Family Leave Act (NJFLA).

Read full article

New York State Tacks on an Extra Year to Its Paid Vaccination Leave Law

Back in March 2021, when it wasn’t easy for many people to get an appointment for an inoculation against COVID-19, New York State created an incentive for employees to get vaccinated.  A new provision was added to the Labor Law, requiring employers to provide paid leave time to employees to obtain each dose. As we previously noted, this statute was intended to sunset on December 31, 2022. However, as this year’s busy legislative session wound down, a bill extending the provision was delivered to Governor Kathy Hochul, who signed off on a 12-month extension of the law’s effective date, through December 31, 2023. Thus, New York employers will be required to provide their employees up to four hours of paid time off for each COVID-19 shot through (at least) the end of next year.

Read full article

Restrictive Covenants May Raise Ethical Issues for Attorneys

Our colleagues Peter A. Steinmeyer, Erik W. Weibustand Angel A. Perezattorneys at Epstein Becker Green, co-authored a 2022 Thomson Reuters Practical Law Practice Note titled “Ethical Issues for Attorneys Related to Restrictive Covenants.”

Read full article

Le droit de gérance légitime versus le harcèlement psychologique au travail

Only available in French

Faire la différence entre le droit de gérance de l’employeur et le harcèlement psychologique ressenti par un employé peut être difficile. Le principe du harcèlement psychologique au travail est souvent galvaudé et utilisé à toutes sauces. Les désaccords ou conflits entre collègues ou avec un supérieur ne constituent pas, dans tous les cas, du harcèlement psychologique au travail au sens de la loi.

Read full article

Video: Remote and Hybrid Work Policies, COVID-19 Positivity, NLRB/FTC Team Up on Non-Competes – Employment Law This Week

As featured in #WorkforceWednesdayThis week, we look at the business, legal, and tax implications of making decisions on a trend that’s here to stay: remote work.

Read full article

Healthcare Noncompete Laws Get a Checkup in Four States and the District of Columbia

As readers of this blog likely know, many states have entirely different statutory schemes for noncompetes in the healthcare industry. Indeed, while 47 states generally permit noncompetes, more than a dozen expressly prohibit or limit them in certain sectors of the healthcare industry – typically for patient-facing clinicians.

For example, in Massachusetts, noncompetes are not permissible in “[a]ny contract or agreement which creates or establishes the terms of a partnership, employment, or any other form of professional relationship with a physician registered to practice medicine . . . , which includes any restriction of the right of such physician to practice medicine in any geographic area for any period of time after the termination of such partnership, employment or professional relationship.” The same restriction applies to Massachusetts nurses, psychologists, and social workers.

Read full article

Llinks Legal Alert – Labor & Employment Law (July 2022)

Welcome to read: “Llinks Legal Alert – Labor & Employment Law (July 2022)”.

Llinks Legal Alerts focus on cutting-edge labor law topics and brings you most updated legislation trend. Please stay tuned with us.  Read more…

Read full article

Video: New COVID-19 Testing Guidance, NLRB Increases Use of Injunctive Relief, D.C. Amends Near-Universal Ban on Non-Competes – Employment Law This Week

As featured in #WorkforceWednesday:  This week, we update you on new COVID-19 guidance and union organizing and non-compete trends at the federal and local levels.

Read full article