ILN IP Insider

Don’t Smile at the Camera – New Biometric Data Laws

Biometric data is seen as a preferred means of identification by many businesses. Unlocking a smartphone using facial recognition and other biometric identifiers, for example, gives users the feeling as if they are more protected (e.g., less risk of identity theft). However, similar to the boom in privacy developments and legislation related to the collection and use of more traditional personal information, the growth of biometric data use by businesses, law enforcement, employers and other organizations has given rise to renewed privacy concerns and legal developments.

While there is no uniform federal biometric data privacy law, several states either have existing laws or are in the process of drafting or ratifying new laws. Although it remains to be seen how such legislation will change the industry’s use of and reliance upon biometric data, that it is increasingly the subject of analysis and discussion indicates a demand and a need for reasonable security and privacy practices around the collection and processing of biometric data, whether required by law or not.

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Protecting Confidential Information in Canada: Is there a Better Way?

The British Columbia decision Equustek Solutions Inc. v Jack[1] highlights the difficult, time consuming, and expensive exercise that organizations may find themselves in when an employee misuses confidential information. In today’s environment, information can be downloaded, transferred or shared instantly. How can organizations best protect their intellectual property assets and confidential information to maintain their competitive advantage?

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AUSTRALIAN PATENT LAW UPDATE – THE HIGH COURT HAS OVERTURNED OVER 100 YEARS OF LAW, FAVOURING THE US DOCTRINE OF EXHAUSTION

Late last year, the High Court of Australia overturned more than 100 years of precedent when it handed down its decision in Calidad Pty Ltd v Seiko Epson Corporation [2020] HCA 41 (Calidad v Seiko). Rather than following the existing principle of ‘implied licence’, in its decision, the High Court adopted a US common law patent doctrine, which provides that a patentee’s monopoly rights over its inventions are ‘exhausted’ after sale (the exhaustion doctrine).

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BANKSY’S “FLOWER THROWER” TRADEMARK: A CRITICAL APPRAISAL OF THE RECENT DECISION OF EUIPO CANCELLATION DIVISION

The Cancellation Division of EUIPO has recently issued a resounding decision declaring the invalidity of the figurative trademark representing the “Flower thrower”, one of the most iconic Banksy’s mural paintings.

The motivations on which the decision is based are questionable since it seems to be willing to take a punitive stance against the British street artist due to his commonly known distaste for intellectual property rights.

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Cash rebate and tax relief for production of audiovisual works

Introduction

In recent years there has been a remarkable effort to make Greece an attractive destination for the production of audiovisual works (eg, films, TV series and video games). The most important initiatives in this respect are:

  • the cash rebate state aid scheme, which covers 40% of eligible production costs; and
  • the tax relief incentive, which covers 30% of eligible production costs.

An audiovisual work may qualify for both the cash rebate scheme and the tax relief,(1) provided that this complies with the EU Block Exemption Regulation (651/2014).

This article provides a brief outline of the above incentives.

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The King Is Dead! Long Live The King!: Elvis Sightings, Taking Care of Business, And Rights Of Post-Mortem Publicity

Never let me go…
I’ll be yours through all the years,
till the end of time.

[Love Me Tender, performed by Elvis Presley]

Elvis sightings have had a long, storied life of their own since the King of Rock-and-Roll’s “death” was reported (or perhaps exaggerated (though neither greatly nor grossly)), in 1977.  Indeed, since 1977, it has been claimed that Mr. Presley had an uncredited appearance in the movie Home Alone in 1990, that Elvis sweetly inspired healing miracles before 1977, and that since 1977 his miracles have included pedestrian healings as well as more impressive feats such resurrection and reincarnation.  Were those sorts of things, or more mundane media mentions, not themselves sufficient post-mortem publicity to keep the King in our thoughts, a New Jersey federal district court, in Estate of Elvis Presley v. Russen, 513 F. Supp. 1339, 1344 and 1355 (D.N.J. 1981), said that “On August 16, 1977, Elvis Presley died,” purportedly, “but his legend and worldwide popularity have survived…” and “Elvis Presley’s right of publicity survived his death and became part of Presley’s estate.”  TCB in a flash, or, for the uninitiated, just a way of taking care of the business of personal musical empire.

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Protection of Photographic Works

With the development of science and technology, cameras or mobile phones are now having various built-in shooting modes or parameters to facilitate photographers to quickly shoot assorted scenes or atmospheres, which is quite different from the traditional way that photographers need to adjust various parameters by themselves. Regarding whether the photographic works taken using the built-in shooting modes or parameters of the camera or mobile phone meets the requirements of the Copyright Act for “creativeness (originality)”, the Intellectual Property Court adopted positive opinions both in the Min-Zhu-Shang-Zi No. 2 Judgment rendered on October 22, 2020, and the Min-Zhu-Shang-Yi-Zi No. 15 Judgment on October 29, 2020.

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Can Trademarks having Domain Indicators Like “Dot Com” be Registered?

Suppose that you want to federally register a trademark that has a domain indicator like “.com” at the end that identifies a source of goods or services related to your business.  The trademark may have a first part that is generic like “automobile” and a second part that is a domain indicator like “.com”.  Should you attempt to register your trademark with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO)?  Can you obtain a registration from the USPTO?  The answer to both questions is YES!

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Protecting Your IP: Social Media Dos and Don’ts

Social media continues to offer an invaluable platform for natural products brands to engage and expand their customer base. In these times, consumers are using social media more and more—particularly on their mobile devices—to stay informed, explore new products, and shop.

This rapt audience allows brands to provide authentic and of-the-moment communications to their customers, develop brand ethos and drive sales. But, even with all the benefits of social media, just one misstep on intellectual property can have significant repercussions.

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CANADIAN INNOVATION DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC

Canadian Innovation Week, namely November 16th to November 20th this year, is a movement organized by the Rideau Hall Foundation and Canadian Innovation Space which seeks to recognize Canadians advancing their respective industries and sectors, to connect individuals across the country and to encourage collaboration, creativity and innovation amongst current and future innovators.

Canadian Innovation Week is being held virtually this year. Many of the week’s conversations concern efforts related to the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic. Below, we briefly outline some of the major developments in the past eight months with respect to intellectual property innovation during the pandemic.

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