Monthly Archives: July 2021

A Growing Number of California Counties, Including Los Angeles and San Francisco, Change Course on Indoor Masking

Counties across California are making a detour on the road to easing COVID-19 restrictions.

Los Angeles County  

On July 16, 2021, Los Angeles County issued an Order of the Health Officer (“the Order”) that requires all persons to wear face masks while in all indoor public settings, venues, gatherings, and businesses (i.e., office workplaces, retail, restaurants, theaters, meetings), with limited exceptions.  In indoor settings where there is close contact with unvaccinated individuals, the Order recommends that people consider wearing a higher level of protection, such as two masks (“double masking”) or a KN95 or N95 respirator. In addition to requiring face masks of all patrons, hosts of public indoor settings must also clearly post visible and legible signage, regardless of whether employee(s) are present, at all entry points for indoor and outdoor settings to communicate the masking requirement.

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California Court of Appeal Reaches Perplexing Conclusion That Even Employees Whose Claims Are Time-Barred Can Still Bring PAGA Representative Actions

In a decision that seems like to be reviewed by the California Supreme Court or rejected by other California Courts of Appeal, one of California’s appellate courts has issued a perplexing decision holding that even employees whose claims are time-barred can file representative actions under California’s Private Attorneys General Act (“PAGA”).

In Gina Johnson v. Maxim Healthcare Services, Inc., the Fourth Appellate District held that the plaintiff could pursue PAGA claims on behalf of other employees even though her own claims were barred by the statute of limitations.

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ILN Today Post

Congratulations to Our Nine Attorneys Named to Mountain States Super Lawyers and Rising Stars 2021

Royal Oak, Mich., July 22, 2021 – Royal Oak, Mich.-based Howard & Howard is pleased to announce that nine of our attorneys have been named to Mountain States Super Lawyers® and Mountain States Rising Stars 2021. Super Lawyers, a Thomson Reuters business, is a rating service of outstanding lawyers from more than 70 practice areas who have attained a high degree of peer recognition and professional achievement. The annual selections are made using a patented multiphase process that includes a statewide survey of lawyers, an independent research evaluation of candidates, and peer reviews by practice area. Mountain States Super Lawyers covers the states of Nevada, Utah, Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming. Only five percent of the attorneys in each state were named to the Super Lawyers list and two- and one-half percent to Rising Stars.

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New rules for medical devices registration in Eurasian Union

Eurasian Economic Commission adopted Recommendations No. 15 “On amendments to Rules for medical devices registration in Eurasian economic union” on 29 June 2021. The Rules were approved by Eurasian Economic Commission on 12 November 2018.

New Recommendations amended the rules for the registration of different medical devices. New rules shall be applied from 2 July 2021.

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Philippe Brassard Joins Our Business Law Group

July 22, 2021 — Philippe Brassard, who was officially called to the Bar yesterday, is joining RSS’s Business Law Group, within which he had already made his mark as an articling student. An alumnus of the University of Montréal, he has a passion for the business world that clients have come to appreciate.

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Delaware Set to Increase Minimum Wage to $15 by 2025

On July 19, 2021, Delaware Governor John Carney signed legislation that will gradually increase the state’s minimum wage to $15 per hour by 2025. This is a substantial increase from Delaware’s current minimum wage of $9.25 per hour. The minimum wage requirements apply to all employers who employ individuals in the state.

Following the examples set by neighboring Maryland and New Jersey, Delaware’s minimum wage increase will occur in phases. Effective January 1, 2022, the minimum wage will increase to $10.50 per hour. Thereafter, the minimum wage will increase annually on the following schedule:

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Rainmaking Recommendation from Jaimie Field: A Deeper Dive into Rainmaking Tactics (Part 4 – Writing)

Join us for this week’s rainmaking recommendation from trainer and coach, Jaimie Field.

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In Rainmaking Recommendation #249, I explained that two of the best tactics you could use were public speaking and writing for showcasing your knowledge.  And while that Rainmaking Recommendation delved into public speaking, this one dives into writing.

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To hold a remote meeting will be easer

On July 1, 2021, Federal Law No. 225-FZ of 28.06.2021 “On Amendments to Part One of the Civil Code of the Russian Federation” (the Law) aimed at improving and increasing the effectiveness of holding remote meetings came into force.

The last year of the pandemic has revealed the urgent need for legislative consolidation and settlement of issues related to holding meetings remotely. The adoption of the Law unambiguously solves some of the accumulated problems.

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Video: Biden Seeks to Boost Competition, HERO Act Guidance, and Key Nominees Advance – Employment Law This Week

As featured in #WorkforceWednesday:  This week, we focus on President Biden’s recent push to limit non-compete agreements and finalize key labor and employment appointments.

Biden Executive Order Seeks to Boost Competition

President Biden has issued an expansive executive order, which aims to boost competition across the U.S. economy, lower prices for consumers, and increase pay for workers. The order encourages federal action to ban or limit non-compete agreements, reigniting a policy debate which raged at the end of the Obama administration over when and how non-competes can be enforced. Learn more.

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WHAT, IN THE NAME OF GOD, …?: Intellectual Property Rights In Holy Names, Sacred Words, & Other Aspects of Creation

The title of this piece tracks a common “phrase of exasperation used to emphasize a question or statement.”  If that be the case, and I think it is, then the subtitle implies the question this piece will address.  That question is “how have various countries’ intellectual property laws addressed efforts to copyright, trademark, or patent holy names, sacred words, or outputs of creation?”  The title, of course, also is a bit of play on words, as it asks the question more directly “what intellectual property rights are out there that people can acquire ‘in the name of God’?” That can mean rights to the name (or one of the names) itself.  It can also mean as the proxy or substitute holder of rights here on earth because no spiritual being will receive a copyright certificate, trademark registrations, or letters patent.  So a lot is implied in, or possible from, the title (as is often my intent on this blog).

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