Monthly Archives: December 2020

ILN Today Post

Howard & Howard’s Jeffrey A. Hoover Selected to 2020 “Michigan’s Go To Business Lawyers” by Michigan Lawyers Weekly

ROYAL OAK, Mich., December 8, 2020 – Attorney Jeffrey A. Hoover has been named to Michigan Lawyers Weekly’s inaugural class of “Michigan’s Go To Business Lawyers.” The newly launched program recognizes the top 20 lawyers across the state in a given practice area as nominated by their peers.

A “Michigan Go To Lawyer” is an expert in his or her field, well-versed in the nuances of the case law, statutes and regulations clients will encounter; experienced, with a record of success in many cases and/or transactions; a lawyer to whom other lawyers make referrals because of his or her expertise and accomplishments; a lawyer who can think creatively and identify all options for a client; a lawyer you would name when a friend needs legal help; and a lawyer you might call yourself if you needed legal help in his or her field of expertise.

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Update on the Requirement to Disclose Your Prête-Nom or Nominee Agreements to Revenu Québec

By Sharon G. Druker and Geneviève Goulet, from our Business Law Group.

December 8, 2020 — As previously explained in our August 15, 2019 newsletter, Revenu Québec announced new rules on May 17, 2019 requiring the disclosure of all nominee agreements. The application of those rules was suspended until regulations could be adopted. Bill 42 implementing these rules was made final on September 24, 2020, and those rules are now in effect (An Act to give effect to fiscal measures announced in the Budget Speech delivered on 21 March 2019 and to various other measures, SQ 2020, c 16).

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“Self Care” isn’t just a Buzzword – it’s Good Business

I’m working on a new podcast with some friends of mine, and our topic for yesterday was the idea of “self care” and what it means. One of them mentioned that she hadn’t even heard the term “self-care” until 18 months ago, and while it was more familiar to me, we did delve into the idea that had it not been for the pandemic, we didn’t think it was something that we would have come to reflect on as much.

As someone with a MAJOR type-A personality (ask anyone who knows me), who is a wee bit of a workaholic, my idea of self care has always been things like guiltily scheduling a massage during one of the hours I get to myself during a work conference or not checking my email while with family (I live alone, so…that’s not very often). This might sound noble, but I assure you, it isn’t.

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Value-Based Payments: A Comprehensive State Survey

Epstein Becker Green (“EBG”) has released Value-Based Payments: A Comprehensive State Survey.

EBG has researched, compiled, and analyzed state-specific content about the regulatory requirements involved in providers moving away from fee for service reimbursement (such as discounted fees and per diems) and towards value-based payment arrangements involving “downside” risk or insurance risk-sharing with insurers, HMOs, and other types of state-regulated health plans. Some types of risk-sharing arrangements include capitation, shared savings and losses, and percentage of premium reimbursement.

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Lidings Takes Advanced Positions in New Pravo.ru–300 Rating

Lidings Takes Advanced Positions in New Pravo.ru–300 Rating

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The Obligation to Defend: The Superior Court Steps In

By Patrick Henry, from our Insurance Law Practice Group.

December 4, 2020 — The Superior Court’s decision in Labelle c. Jivestudio Inc., 2020 QCCS 3420, rendered in the midst of the pandemic, ruled on the underlying criteria to determine, at a preliminary stage, whether an insurer has an obligation to take up its insured’s defence.

The plaintiff was seriously injured while performing an acrobatic manoeuvre with a troupe from the defendant Jivestudio’s dance school. She is now paralyzed and must use a wheelchair. She, along with members of her family, sues the dance studio, its owners and the people who participated in the training on the day of the accident. She alleges that the manoeuvre she was asked to practice was dangerous and that the coaches and participants were not adequately trained.

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What’s “So” Important: Computer Fraud and Abuse Act Gets a Close Look from SCOTUS

In a case with significant ramifications for employers concerned with protecting sensitive information, and for employees accused of abusing access to computer networks, the United States Supreme Court (“SCOTUS”) heard oral argument this week in Van Buren v. United States, No. 19-783, a case from the Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit that will require interpretation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (“CFAA”), 18 U.S.C. § 1030.  The argument was lively.  All of the Justices asked questions, and several expressed concern about vagueness in the CFAA’s definition of covered activity.  Much of the discussion centered on an alleged “parade of horribles,” and on the meaning of the word “so.”  We expect a relatively prompt decision.  Time will tell what SCOTUS will decide, but we would not be surprised to see a reversal and remand.

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ILN Releases 7th Edition of Corporate Publication, Offering a Summary of Key Corporate Law Principles in 45 Countries

It’s the most wonderful time of the year! No, not that…the ILN’s Corporate Guide has been released!

The International Lawyers Network’s Corporate Specialty Group is delighted to announce the seventh release of its corporate publication, “Establishing a Business Entity: An International Guide.” This collaborative electronic guide offers a summary of key corporate law principles in 45 countries across the globe, serving as a quick, practical reference for those establishing an entity in these jurisdictions.

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ILN Today Post

News regarding Covid-19 regulations

The state of emergency related to the spread of Covid-19 in Latvia has been extended until 11 January 2021, strengthening the previously established restrictions.

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CDC’s Revised Guidance Allows for Shorter Quarantine Periods for Close Contacts

In advance of the December holiday season, the CDC has issued a revised guidance on recommended quarantine periods.

The revised guidance provides shortened quarantine periods for individuals who have been in close contact with someone who has COVID-19. While the CDC maintains that the 14-day quarantine period provides greater protection for reducing transmission of the coronavirus, the agency has now provided two shorter options, which it says are designed to help alleviate the personal economic hardship associated with the extended quarantine period.

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