Monthly Archives: June 2020

Video: How Mobile Technology Can Help Employers in a Post-COVID-19 Workplace –Employment Law This Week

As featured in #WorkforceWednesday: Mobile technologies, including contact tracing and screening apps, will help safely bring employees back to work. However, there are a range of employment law and privacy concerns to consider before implementing these technologies. Attorneys Adam S. Forman and Karen Mandelbaum tell us more. You can also read more in a recent Law360 article.

Read full article

Northern Virginia and Richmond Enter Reopening Phase Two Lifting COVID-19 Restrictions

On June 9, 2020, Governor Ralph Northam announced that Northern Virginia and Richmond will join the rest of the state in entering Phase Two on June 12, 2020, taking the next step to reopening the region.  Governor Northam’s Executive Order 65 further eased temporary restrictions throughout most of the Commonwealth of Virginia, initiating the “Safer at Home: Phase Two” strategy on June 5, 2020.

Read full article

The Courts’ Reopening Continues: “Priority” as Well as “Urgent” Matters Are Now Being Heard

June 12, 2020 – Jean-Pierre Sheppard and Lauren Flam, of our Commercial Litigation Department, obtained an interim injunction yesterday to force a defendant who was defaming a company to cease and desist. The Court held that the unfounded accusations of financial impropriety and alleged product quality problems were being circulated in bad faith with the purpose of causing harm to the company.

Defendant was ordered to immediately cease initiating any contact with the company’s customers, suppliers and its other business partners.

Read full article
ILN Today Post

Rewards and Risks for Distressed Strategic Middle Market M&A

During the bull market that followed the recovery from the 2008 financial crisis, we saw robust and sustained merger and acquisition (M&A) activity. Acquisitive companies pursued target businesses with strong balance sheets and bright growth prospects. Acquirers and targets became accustomed to broad rules of the road that guided M&A valuation, structure and process and informed transaction risk and reward. The coronavirus pandemic and its resulting economic dislocation will upend many of those rules. Read more…

Read full article
ILN Today Post

OSHA Guidance Requires Certain Employers to Record “Work-Related” COVID-19 Cases

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recently issued new guidance on employers’ obligation to document COVID-19 cases in the workplace for OSHA recordkeeping purposes. Specifically, employers who are required to keep OSHA 300 logs are now required to record cases of COVID-19 (which OSHA considers a respiratory illness) on such logs if the employer determines that the employee’s COVID-19 illness is work-related.

The new guidance went into effect on May 26, 2020 and is an abrupt departure from OSHA’s previous guidance. Read more…

Read full article
ILN Today Post

The FDA Sends Over 60 Warning Letters to Companies for Falsely Marketing “COVID-19 Products”

In the wake of the global pandemic caused by the novel coronavirus, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued dozens of warning letters to various companies — including so-called ‘affiliate marketers’ — asserting that they have fraudulently marketed products that claim to prevent, treat, mitigate, diagnosis or cure COVID-19. These products include vitamin and mineral products, essential oils, colloidal silver, CBD oils and many others. Read more…

Read full article
ILN Today Post

Howard & Howard Welcomes William R. Hancock

Royal Oak, Mich., June 11, 2020 – Royal Oak-based Howard & Howard is pleased to announce the addition of attorney William R. Hancock to the firm. Billy joined Howard & Howard in 2015 as a full-time intellectual property intern while attending evening law school classes. He will remain in the firm’s Royal Oak office.

“I’m committed to obtaining the strong IP protection that businesses need for their most important innovations.”–William R. Hancock

Read full article

COVID-19 Short-Time Working in Luxembourg

Along with many European countries, the COVID-19 pandemic has affected employers and employees in Luxembourg.  On March 17, 2020, the Government of Luxembourg issued a State of Emergency until June 25, 2020 and implemented several measures and guidance to prevent the spread of COVID-19.  Luxembourg’s population of approximately 625,000, reportedly has 4,040 confirmed cases of COVID-19, 110 COVID-19 fatalities and 3,901 individuals who have recovered from the coronavirus.

Similar to other European jurisdictions, Luxembourg provides employers and employees with “short-time” working opportunities in various circumstances, including due to cyclical economic problems, structural economic problems, in the event of force majeure and due to economic dependence.

Read full article

Rainmaking Recommendation from Jaimie Field: Lawyer Marketing and Business Development After Lockdown

In this week’s Rainmaking Recommendation, trainer and expert, Jaimie Field, talks with us about what to expect post-lockdown.

***

Let’s start with the obvious:  Nothing will ever be the same.

And in many instances, this is not a bad thing.

Read full article

Moscow city Duma proposed to legalise remote work in the Labour Code of the Russian Federation

Deputies of the Moscow city Duma introduced a bill1 suggesting adding provisions for remote work to the Labour Code. The ground for making such amendments are the difficulties in formalising transfer of employees to remote work which the employers faced during the pandemic.

As indicated in the explanatory memorandum to the bill, “at present, a significant part of citizens, due to the current epidemiological situation, temporarily or partially (according to a special schedule) carries out their work in remote form, that is, outside the main stationary workplace”. Indeed, non-working days declared in Russia were only nominative non-working: the majority of employees proceeded to work from home. It was a kind of challenge for many employers, since the existing legislation does not provide for the possibility of remote, rather than distant work (for differences see here).

Read full article