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Opposing a tenant’s 1954 Act lease renewal – Part 3

This is the third in a series of articles looking at the grounds a landlord can use to oppose a tenant’s lease renewal where the lease is protected by the terms of the Landlord and Tenant Act 1954. In this article we are going to be looking at the grounds of opposition contained in sections 30(1)(d) and 30(1)(e). These are both referred to as “non-fault” grounds, where the landlord is not relying on the default of the tenant but on a ground given within the statute which, if proven, entitles the landlord to possession and disentitles the tenant to a new lease. If a landlord is successful in opposing a lease renewal relying on either of these grounds then a new lease will not be granted to the tenant. However, if the landlord is successful when relying on section 30(1)(e) statutory compensation is payable to the tenant. We will see in the next quarter’s article that statutory compensation is also payable to a tenant if a landlord successfully relies on the grounds in section 30(1)(f) and section 30(1)(g). More…