Monthly Archives: December 2014

Epstein Becker Green’s Free Wage-Hour App Has Added More Checklists for Employers

Wage Hour Guide ChecklistsAs readers of this blog know, EBG’s free wage-hour app is now available for download on Apple, Android, and Blackberry devices. The app puts federal wage-hour laws and those of many states at users’ fingertips.

Now, the app also includes 7 checklists that employers should find helpful.

Each of the following checklists can be accessed through the “Downloads” icon on the app, then downloaded in seconds:

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ILN Today Post

FEDERAL COURT UPHOLDS DARLINGTON REFURBISHMENT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

Stanley D. Berger B.C.L.,L.L.B, Certified Specialist Environmental Law
On November 25, 2014 the Federal Court of Canada upheld decisions by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) in which these responsible authorities (RA’s), charged with completing an environmental assessment (EA) under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act 1992 c.37 (CEAA) , concluded that Ontario Power Generation’s (OPG) proposal for refurbishing the four nuclear reactors at the Darlington Nuclear generating Facility in Clarington, Ontario would not likely cause significant adverse environmental effects. (decision at 2014 FC 1124.) More…

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Two for Tuesday: Review & Prepare

Somehow, it’s already December.

I know, I can’t believe it either. But it’s true. And you know what that means – it’s time to review 2014 and prepare for 2015. A lot of people have already started this process, but I like to leave it until after our last conference of the year, so that I can incorporate as much feedback from my clients as possible. 

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Clare’s Law Unveiled in Scotland

A pilot scheme, known as Clare’s Law, has been rolled out across Aberdeen and Ayrshire as part of the Scottish Government’s aim to tackle domestic abuse.

The Disclosure Scheme for Domestic Abuse Scotland will be piloted for six months and could become a permanent law if it proves to be successful in its initial run.

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ILN Today Post

Singapore branching into new international dispute resolution territory

Singapore has passed legislation for the creation of the Singapore International Commercial Court (SICC), in addition to launching the Singapore International Mediation Centre (SIMC), expanding the services offered to businesses operating in the Asia-Pacific region to resolve cross-border disputes and further cementing its position as a leading international dispute resolution hub. More…

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ILN Today Post

Update on the JAEPA, the new Biosecurity Bills and the Illegal Logging Legislation

As we move into the last sitting week for Federal Parliament for 2014, there have been significant moves in relation to legislation for the Japan – Australia Economic Partnership Agreement (JAEPA) and the proposed new Biosecurity Bills at the same time as the next stage of the Illegal Logging Legislation comes into effect.

JAEPA

As reported earlier the JAEPA has been subject to review to JSCOT, which in Report 144, recommended that Australia take Treaty action to adopt the JAEPA. More…

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ILN Today Post

AAT reels in use of TCOs once again

A very recent decision of the AAT has continued the very strict approach to use of Tariff Concession Orders (TCOs) and underlines the need for caution to how they are drafted and used. The judgment again throws up questions as to the way in which the Australian Customs and Border Protection Service (“Customs“) makes decisions in this area and the way in which disputes are conducted before the AAT.

The decision (J M Gillies Agencies Pty Ltd v CEO of Customs) included a review of decisions by Customs to classify goods to a particular tariff classification which denied the importer the use of a TCO. More…

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Scope of Uniform Trade Secrets Act Trimmed By Arizona Supreme Court

A recent Opinion issued by the Arizona Supreme Court highlights a noteworthy dichotomy in the way various states interpret the pre-emptive effect of their respective Uniform Trade Secrets Acts (“UTSA”). Forty-eight states have enacted some form of the UTSA, which aims to codify and harmonize standards and remedies regarding misappropriation of trade secrets that had emerged in common law and which differed from state to state. Only New York and Massachusetts have not enacted some form of the UTSA.

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