Home > News > And the Survey Says . . . Results of the NAWL Foundation’s "National Survey of Women’s Initiatives: The Strategy, Structure and Scope of Women’s Initiatives in Law Firms"

And the Survey Says . . . Results of the NAWL Foundation’s "National Survey of Women’s Initiatives: The Strategy, Structure and Scope of Women’s Initiatives in Law Firms"

Maxine Neuhauserby Maxine Neuhauser

It’s been 10 years since EBG inaugurated its Women’s Initiative program with the goal of enhancing the careers of professional women by providing opportunities both inside and outside the office to network, share information, acquire skills, and develop rewarding professional relationships. Although we didn’t realize it at the time, we were part of movement. As reported by the NAWL Foundation®, during the past decade, women’s initiatives and women’s affinity groups have become a staple of law firm culture. Programs like ours are aimed at helping women advance into higher levels of practice, i.e., gaining equity status, generating and receiving credit for business, participating in firm governance, and achieving greater compensation.

EBG was one of the more than 100 law firms that participated in a survey conducted by the NAWL Foundation, the research and charitable arm of the National Association of Women Lawyers (NAWL), to provide benchmark data on the structures, strategies, and scope of women’s initiatives among the nation’s largest law firms.

The NAWL Foundation® has just released the results in a report, “National Survey of Women’s Initiatives: The Strategy, Structure and Scope of Women’s Initiatives in Law Firms.” A copy of the report is available for downloading by clicking here.

Have our programs succeeded? Have we made a difference? Do we need to evolve? Stay the course? Are our goals still relevant? We are gratified to be part of an important movement to advance women in the legal profession and grateful for the data, analysis, insights, and suggestions provided by the NAWL Foundation survey and to the many women (and men) who contributed to the project. We will certainly be taking the information into consideration as we begin our second decade and take on the questions of “what works?” and “what’s next?”