Employee Benefits: The IRS announces new retirement plan limitations for 2015

On October 23, 2014, the IRS announced cost of living adjustments affecting dollar limitations for pension plans and other retirement-related items for the Tax Year 2015. Many of the limitations have changed from the limits that are in place for 2014.

Below are the 2015 plan limitations:

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Richard Weiland and Marion Allan to present at CLE

Richard Weiland is presenting today at the Estate Planning Update 2014 for the Continuing Legal Education Society of BC. Richard will be speaking on the topic, “A Trust’s Three Tax Challenges that Every Estate Planner Should Understand”, which include the attribution rules, the 21 year rule and taxation of trust distributions. At tomorrow’s Estate Litigation Update 2014, Marion Allan will be presenting on the topic, “Mediation/Arbitration/Settlement Conferences”, which will discuss using the best process in the appropriate case, preparation for the proceeding, promoting a consent resolution and documenting the settlement.

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The 5 Issues That Trouble Regulators When Evaluating Direct-to-Consumer Telehealth

There can be no question that telehealth has gone mainstream.  The numbers speak volumes. Telehealth companies have been able to raise almost $500 million since 2007 according to a noted venture capital analyst.  A recent study indicated that U.S. employers could save up to $6 billion a year through telehealth.  Per the American Telemedicine Association, more than half of all U.S. hospitals now offer some form of telehealth service.  Some leading analysts estimate that global revenue for telehealth will reach $4.5 billion by 2018, and the number of patients using telehealth services will rise to 7 million by the same year.   I can cite countless examples showing the bullish trajectory of telehealth.  But problems remain.

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Indiana Appellate Court Reverses Non-Compete Injunction Bond Of Only $100

The size of an injunction bond is not a common topic in appellate cases. Accordingly, a recent decision by the Indiana Appellate Court reversing the trial court’s setting of an injunction bond at only $100 in a non-compete case is noteworthy.

In Donald Moss v. Progressive Design Apparel, Inc., the Indiana Appellate Court affirmed a preliminary injunction which restricted a salesman’s ability to call upon customers of his former employer or disclose confidential information. As part of the trial court’s order granting injunctive relief, the trial court found that the enjoined salesman’s foreseeable loss in commissions due to the injunction “might be $60,000, less what he would have in the way of earnings from the extra ten to fifteen hours a week he would have by not selling” to one of his former employer’s customers. Nevertheless, the trial court only required the former employer to post a $100 injunction bond, which the Appellate Court held was insufficient.

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General Counsel Corner: Selecting Outside Counsel

Today, we welcome to the General Counsel Corner Tina Rao, the Chief Counsel, Healthcare for Maxim Healthcare Inc.

Our question to Ms. Rao was:

What is your process for selecting outside counsel?”

She let us know that: 

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ILN Today Post

Australian Federal Government moves on competitiveness and anti-circumvention

The policy space for those in the International Trade, Customs and related agricultural reform field has got much more crowded in the space of the last month!

If I may attempt to summarise

  • On Monday (20 October 2014) the Federal Government released its “Agricultural Competitiveness Green Paper”.  To view this paper click here.  The paper is a discussion of possible options proposed by stakeholders for improving the competitiveness of the agricultural sector.  The Government has invited stakeholders to comment on the Green Paper by 12 December 2014.  The finalised policy directions for improving the profitability and competitiveness of the agriculture sector will then be detailed in a “White Paper” as a precursor to actual reform. More…
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ILN Today Post

Sale of a leased property – pleasure or pain?

In the property market it is usual to sell such commercial or residential real estates that are leased out. On the basis of the new Civil Code, the seller of such property will not be relieved, by the sale, from its liability towards the tenants. If the purchaser breaches any of its obligations towards the tenants, then the seller may also be held liable, even if the property had been sold many years ago. More…

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ILN Today Post

Sheila Cesarano Recognized as One of the Top 20 Women in Law

DAILY BUSINESS REVIEW, OCTOBER 15, 2014

Sheila Cesarano has been recognized as one of the Top 20 Women in Law in South Florida, by the Daily Business Review. An accomplished attorney, Ms. Cesarano was selected due to the longevity of her career as a high-caliber litigator. She, along with all honorees, was recognized at a luncheon on October 15, 2014. More…

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Ontario Court Upholds Citizenship Oath’s Allegiance to the "Queen of Canada"

The Canadian Citizenship Act (“Act”) requires permanent residents who wish to become Canadian citizens to swear an oath or make an affirmation in the following form:
 
I swear (or affirm) that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth the Second, Queen of Canada Her Heirs and Successors and that I will faithfully observe the laws of Canada and fulfill my duties as a Canadian citizen. 
 
In the case of McAteer v. Canada (Attorney General), 2014 ONCA 578, the appellants objected to the portion of the oath that referred to being faithful and bearing true allegiance to the Queen, her heirs and successors.  They asserted that the requirement to swear or affirm allegiance to the Queen in order to become a Canadian citizen violated their rights of freedom of conscience and religion, freedom of expression and equality under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.  They argued that the government could not justify any such violation as being a reasonable limit in a free and democratic society and sought a declaration that the impugned section of the Citizenship oath was optional. 
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"FDA’s LDT proposal means ‘whole new ballgame’ for labs," Rick Cooper and Jane Pine Wood featured in CAP TODAY

October 2014—The Food and Drug Administration’s plan to subject many laboratory-developed tests to a new layer of regulatory requirements over the course of the next decade is drawing sharply contrasting reactions from stakeholders who view it as either an essential step to improve patient safety or a hindrance that will stifle diagnostic innovation and test improvement. 

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